I don't think I understand exposure.

11 months 1 week ago #649013 by NM Ben
Hello! New to the forum, and I've got a question about exposure. I've got a D7100 and my brother has a D5300. Today I took two pictures with the same lighting condition (Two minutes or so apart), nearly identical framing, same exposure compensation, both recording large size fine detail JPEGs, same shutter speed (1/50), same aperture (f8), same ISO (2500), and same lens - One with the d7100 body and one with the D5300 body. Everything I could possibly think of to control was the same , except the camera bodies. I can't come up with any reason that explains the significant difference in exposure between the two pictures. What am I missing? Why are the D5300 picture so much brighter with the same settings? Let me know if I missed any critical info.

d5300 pic 1 and d7100 pic 1 were taken with the same lens.

d5300 pic 2and d7100 pic 2 were taken with different lenses (Tokina 12-28 and Nikon 18-55), but with the same settings, both at 18mm.

Thanks!

Make: NIKON CORPORATION
Model: NIKON D5300
ISO: 2500
Aperture: f/8.0
Shutter speed: 1/50 sec
Captured: Sun, 23 Jun 2019 14:19pm
Make: NIKON CORPORATION
Model: NIKON D7100
ISO: 2500
Aperture: f/8.0
Shutter speed: 1/50 sec
Captured: Sun, 23 Jun 2019 15:15pm
Make: NIKON CORPORATION
Model: NIKON D5300
ISO: 800
Aperture: f/8.0
Shutter speed: 1/50 sec
Captured: Sun, 23 Jun 2019 12:35pm
Make: NIKON CORPORATION
Model: NIKON D7100
ISO: 800
Aperture: f/8.0
Shutter speed: 1/50 sec
Captured: Sun, 23 Jun 2019 13:36pm


Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649023 by KCook
You are right, they should be the same brightness. Did the camera making dark images have a polarizing filter on the lens?

Kelly

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649046 by Nikon Shooter
The OP forgot to mention the MODE in use!

KCook wrote: You are right, they should be the same brightness. Did the camera making dark images have a polarizing filter on the lens


What difference would it have made in any priority mode, Kelly?

Light is free… capturing it is not!
This person is a posting maniac and deserves a #1 badge!Top Poster
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649101 by fmw
Your example is a problem because all of the images are seriously underexposed.  My recommendation would be to repeat your test outdoors on a front lit subject.  If you get a correct exposure then all is well.  If not, then you need to calibrate your meter using the exposure compensation feature.

Meters don't perform well in the very difficult lighting you used for your test.


Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649104 by garyrhook
You didn't specify mode, but we'll assume manual since you indicate aperture/shutter/ISO.

Being underexposed is irrelevant. As is metering. You're making an apples-to-apples comparison, and the same settings should produce reasonably consistent images.

What you didn't mention was exposure compensation. While I don't think it should be involved, check it.

Also: use auto mode on the two cameras and take shots. What do the cameras decide to use?

Finally: reset both cameras to factory settings and try again.


Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649151 by icepics
Resetting to factory settings sounds like a good idea. Filters could make a difference because they're filtering light, so usually less light is coming into the camera.

The camera was set at a fairly slowish shutter speed and high ISO which would tell me the camera needed more light and maybe a larger aperture setting might have helped. Or maybe since a camera is recording light, there just wasn't enough existing light for the camera to get a proper exposure.

I'd try some test shots outdoors in decent light. Indoors it may not seem too dark for us to see but most likely is really low light for the camera to be able to record as good a picture as might be expected. What I do on occasion if I'm using existing light at home indoors is try on a sunny day, open all the blinds/shades/curtains, turn on all the lights, etc. Or, you might need to use a flash.

Sharon
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649156 by shelland
Both are quite underexposed, but certainly one a lot more than the other. As noted, the same settings should produce very similar results if everything was truly the same in terms of lighting conditions, etc. 

Are you sure that the sun didn't go behind clouds or something like that prior to taking the 2nd set? In that case, if shooting manual you would see different results with identical settings. (FYI - your camera clocks are an hour apart :) )

As others have asked, what mode were you shooting in on both cameras? Was it manual? No auto-ISO, etc? If so, that rules out some other options. But if you were shooting aperture priority for example (not likely that it would choose identical settings for all 4 pics if shooting aperture priority), one body could have a max ISO set that would prevent it from going higher. Seems unlikely, but if not shooting full manual it could be something of that sort. 

The suggestion to try again outdoors in good lighting is a good one. But even the smallest thing like the sun going behind a cloud can have a big impact on the 'correct' exposure. 

Scott

- Twin Cities, MN

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649175 by KCook

Nikon Shooter wrote: The OP forgot to mention the MODE in use!

KCook wrote: You are right, they should be the same brightness. Did the camera making dark images have a polarizing filter on the lens


What difference would it have made in any priority mode, Kelly?

Eh?  I made no mention of the shooting mode???

A polarizing filter darkens the light by about 2 stops.  If the camera with decent exposure did not have such a filter, and the one with dark results did have a CPL, that could explain the difference.  A lesson I learned the hard way back when I first used a polarizer.

Kelly

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649182 by Nikon Shooter

KCook wrote: Eh?  I made no mention of the shooting mode???


I know you did not… nor did the OP.

I just think that the selected mode would be, in the
equation, of more pertinence in solving the problem.

Since the info was not given, it makes it more difficult.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
This person is a posting maniac and deserves a #1 badge!Top Poster
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649234 by Shadowfixer1
The shooting mode doesn't matter since the exif for the images match. Why would it matter how you got there if the exif matches? The meter or something is off on one of the cameras. I suggest going outside on a sunny day and metering off a paved road that has some age on it and see which one matches the sunny 16 rule. That will let you know which camera is accurate. If you have a gray card, then that's better but the old pavement trick works if you don't have or want to buy a gray card.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649259 by KCook

Shadowfixer1 wrote: The shooting mode doesn't matter since the exif for the images match. Why would it matter how you got there if the exif matches? The meter or something is off on one of the cameras. I suggest going outside on a sunny day and metering off a paved road that has some age on it and see which one matches the sunny 16 rule. That will let you know which camera is accurate. If you have a gray card, then that's better but the old pavement trick works if you don't have or want to buy a gray card.

Thanks for backing me up on the shooting mode :cheers:

Alas, any meter reading is also irrelevant.  All of the settings used are identical.  So even if the cameras did meter differently, the "bad" reading makes zero difference.  This is still a mystery.

stumped

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649263 by Nikon Shooter

NM Ben wrote: same shutter speed (1/50), same aperture (f8), same ISO (2500), and same lens



Hi Randy and Kelly,

…and same lens… this suggests that no filter was in the equation.
OTOH, if a body was on a priority mode or program and the other
on manual…

Light is free… capturing it is not!
This person is a posting maniac and deserves a #1 badge!Top Poster
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #649272 by shelland

Nikon Shooter wrote:

NM Ben wrote: same shutter speed (1/50), same aperture (f8), same ISO (2500), and same lens



Hi Randy and Kelly,

…and same lens… this suggests that no filter was in the equation.
OTOH, if a body was on a priority mode or program and the other
on manual…

Agreed, seems very unlikely that the same lens would be moved from one body to another and a filter added as well. 

But while the shooting mode would be interesting to know, it also shouldn't have any impact in this case as the EXIF data is identical. No matter what the mode, the Aperture/Shutter/ISO were the same (which means manual mode is likely, as an auto mode probably wouldn't pick the same settings while producing very different results). 

Barring one of the cameras being outright not functioning correctly, the only thing that makes sense is that the sun went behind clouds and changed the ambient light in the room. However having said that, it also seems unlikely that in between two sets of pictures on the two bodies, the same change in lighting condition would occur between the first and second shots to coincidentally give the more underexposed results on the same body.  

Scott

- Twin Cities, MN

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 6 days ago - 11 months 6 days ago #649288 by Shadowfixer1

KCook wrote:

Shadowfixer1 wrote: The shooting mode doesn't matter since the exif for the images match. Why would it matter how you got there if the exif matches? The meter or something is off on one of the cameras. I suggest going outside on a sunny day and metering off a paved road that has some age on it and see which one matches the sunny 16 rule. That will let you know which camera is accurate. If you have a gray card, then that's better but the old pavement trick works if you don't have or want to buy a gray card.

Thanks for backing me up on the shooting mode :cheers:

Alas, any meter reading is also irrelevant.  All of the settings used are identical.  So even if the cameras did meter differently, the "bad" reading makes zero difference.  This is still a mystery.

stumped

You are correct. I went brain dead. The meter reading doesn't matter either since the exifs were the same. I am stumped as well. One camera is not closing down the aperture as much as the other when triggered or something.:blink:
The following user(s) said Thank You: KCook

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 6 days ago #649379 by dpoehlman
I'm going to say make sure the firmware is up-to-date on both cameras. 


And then... I'm going to throw gas on the fire: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVuI89YWAsw


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,

802.3K

205K

1.62M

  • Facebook

    802,251 / Likes

  • Twitter

    205,000 / Followers

  • Google+

    1,620,816 / Followers

Latest Reviews

In the Canon 5D Mark III vs Canon 1D Mark IV battle, which of these older cameras is right for you? Get all the details on these oldies but goodies in this comparison review.

May 27, 2020

The Fujifilm X-T4 was released just a couple of months ago and represents a nice update to the X-T3. In this Fujifilm X-T4 review, we'll discuss specs, features, build, handling, and more.

May 20, 2020

Not sure if the Canon 5Ds R is right for you in 2020? Let us help you decide with this detailed Canon 5Ds R review.

May 20, 2020

Is the Fujifilm GFX 50S medium format camera the right choice for you? Find out in this quick review of its specs, build quality, video capabilities, and more.

May 18, 2020
Get 600+ Pro photo lessons for $1

Forum Top Posters

Latest Articles

There are many reasons why you should print on metal, including the durability and uniqueness of metal prints, as well as all the options you have for customizing your print.

May 29, 2020

Razer has unleashed the 2020 version of their Blade 15 Studio, and it is an incredible machine with the power visual creatives need.

May 29, 2020

Taking self-portraits requires the right gear and the right approach. Get critical portrait photography tips in this quick how-to guide.

May 28, 2020

Investing in right lights for YouTube video production is one of the best things you can do to improve the quality of your videos. Which right lights are right for you though? Find out in this buyer's guide!

May 28, 2020

Canvas or paper prints can be a nice addition to your home, but each one has distinct advantages and disadvantages that are helpful to know before you buy.

May 27, 2020

In the Canon 5D Mark III vs Canon 1D Mark IV battle, which of these older cameras is right for you? Get all the details on these oldies but goodies in this comparison review.

May 27, 2020

I have two high-powered laptops on my desk. In this Macbook vs Razer comparison, I'll break these computers down by specs, pros, and cons.

May 27, 2020

There are plenty of items photographers need, including office equipment that improves your workflow, the functionality of your space, and makes you more comfortable.

May 26, 2020