Mirrorless or DSLR camera for beginner?

1 year 2 weeks ago #652636 by Chase Sanders
I don't have a camera yet.  Well nothing besides by iPhone at least.  To help point my search in the best direction, which is best for beginner photographers, mirrorless or DSLRs?

*From a learn curve standpoint?

Chase


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
1 year 2 weeks ago #652637 by garyrhook
Define "best"?

The best camera is the one you don't want to put down.

The question also involves budget, as your entry point for either system is going to be north of (US) $500.

As a beginner, I would suggest that you use your phone and a RAW app, and learn to manage the exposure triangle first. Then graduate to an interchangeable lens system.

If you have the choice, go to a store and hold different cameras, play with them, see what makes sense and feels good in your hands. Explore the features, figure out what the candidates are, and research those on the web to find out what people think.

In addition, you'll be buying into a system, so you might need to understand how that looks in the future.

There's no simple answer to your question, but for a few $ (if your phone supports it) you can gets started today on learning more.


Photo Comments
The following user(s) said Thank You: Joao Rodrigues

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
1 year 2 weeks ago #652640 by Shadowfixer1
Mirrorless or DSLR doesn't matter. They both generally operate the same way and do the same thing. The big advantage to mirrorless is you see the exposure before you make the image and don't have to wait till afterwards to see the exposure. Size can be smaller with mirrorless. Notice I said can be.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
1 year 2 weeks ago #652643 by Chase Sanders

garyrhook wrote: Define "best"?

The best camera is the one you don't want to put down.

The question also involves budget, as your entry point for either system is going to be north of (US) $500.

As a beginner, I would suggest that you use your phone and a RAW app, and learn to manage the exposure triangle first. Then graduate to an interchangeable lens system.

If you have the choice, go to a store and hold different cameras, play with them, see what makes sense and feels good in your hands. Explore the features, figure out what the candidates are, and research those on the web to find out what people think.

In addition, you'll be buying into a system, so you might need to understand how that looks in the future.

There's no simple answer to your question, but for a few $ (if your phone supports it) you can gets started today on learning more.



Well that's the thing, I feel the phones camera is nice for taking snap shots.  However manual controls are novelty and I don't feel challenged.  So I would like to make a investment into my future. 


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
1 year 2 weeks ago #652649 by KCook

Shadowfixer1 wrote: Mirrorless or DSLR doesn't matter. They both generally operate the same way and do the same thing. The big advantage to mirrorless is you see the exposure before you make the image and don't have to wait till afterwards to see the exposure. Size can be smaller with mirrorless. Notice I said can be.

Right.  I would add another advantage for mirrorless - AF points can be found spread across almost the entire field of view.  (Which will also be true for "Liveview" mode with a DSLR.)  With a DSLR viewfinder the AF points are concentrated in the center portion of the field.

For a beginner the main DSLR advantage is less expensive lenses.  Many, many photographers have started off with a DSLR, so it certainly can be done.

As has already been posted, go with whichever camera has the most appeal to you.

Kelly

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #656683 by michaelsmith
As everyone is saying it really does not matter much. Both cameras pretty much require training and years of shooting experience before you can call yourself a professional. However if you are just starting out, I would recommend a mirrorless system (I love the EOS R) since these cameras will probably dominate the market in a few years.


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago #656772 by Ian Stone
Canon EOS R is getting firmware update next month too that should improve autofocus.  


Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
11 months 1 week ago - 11 months 1 week ago #656788 by Nikon Shooter

Chase Sanders wrote: *From a learn curve standpoint?

From that point, I don't see much of a difference.

Shadowfixer1 wrote: Mirrorless or DSLR doesn't matter.

I would prefer the DLSR since I know what can be done
and have learned to trust it… and have heavily invested
in the system.

I agree with Randy that it doesn't matter if you're consi-
dering  a system that has the same flange throughout all
the lenses range of a given maker but, if one wants to go
the Nikon way, some points should be investigated since
there may be of some minor consequences in the choice.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
This person is a posting maniac and deserves a #1 badge!Top Poster
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 3 weeks ago - 2 months 3 weeks ago #684995 by Nberry1954
Hello, I'm new here. I was researching on which route to take on buying a DSLR or Mirrorless system, and came across this forum and post. I read your answers and they all seem to be about the same. My wife and I are pretty technologically inclined, so complexity isn't really a factor in the long run. We're not looking to become professional photographers, but we would like a good camera for the moments that the phone camera won't suffice. We're mainly taking photos of our infant daughter, so there are a lot of shots where she is moving, walking, etc. My mother gave us her old D40 to use, but we're looking for an upgrade. The AF seems to be a bit slow on the D40, and many photos are blurry. Any advise on which type/model would suit us best would be greatly appreciated. As I mentioned before, from the replies to the OP, it seems that we would be able to choose either, but I was just wondering if anyone had any advise on any specific reason why either would best suit our needs. Our price point would be $400-600 range. Apologies for the long post, and unintentional hijacking of the OP question, if I did. I was trying to avoid duplicating topics. :cheer:


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 3 weeks ago #684997 by KCook
  • infant daughter, so there are a lot of shots where she is moving, walking,
The key here is the light level.  Outdoors in strong light I would expect any camera, including the D40, to be Ok.  If you are taking these shots in a dark room, that is a whole other story.  For low light you could try putting a cheap 50mm f/1.8 prime on your D40.

As for cameras, a general rule with both DSLR and mirrorless is that you can expect better AF with a more expensive (and newer) model.  Some low light advantage to the DSLR, especially at the budget price level.

If you have nice Nikon lenses that you would like to keep using, Nikon now has their mirrorless "Z" series, so no need to leave the Nikon brand.  But these will be over your budget.

If you don't care about sticking with Nikon, and want to try mirrorless, at the price level you gave a used Sony a6300 may have a little edge for low light.

I don't require serious low light performance, just ordered a new Panasonic G85 for myself, still $100 USD above your budget.  Take away a low light requirement and you choices really open up.  Especially for older cameras bought at used prices.  Both DSLR and mirrorless.

Kelly

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 3 weeks ago #684998 by Nberry1954
Thank you for the quick reply, we may look for the Sony you mentioned. I know the price point is on the low end, I really appreciate you taking that into consideration. You also hit the nail on the head with outdoor shooting, 90% of those taken outside were good quality, just indoors with overhead lights on it was struggling. I'll also look at the Panasonic you mentioned. Price point isn't set in stone, but somewhere in that area would be nice.


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 3 weeks ago #685004 by garyrhook

Nberry1954 wrote: Thank you for the quick reply, we may look for the Sony you mentioned. I know the price point is on the low end, I really appreciate you taking that into consideration. You also hit the nail on the head with outdoor shooting, 90% of those taken outside were good quality, just indoors with overhead lights on it was struggling. I'll also look at the Panasonic you mentioned. Price point isn't set in stone, but somewhere in that area would be nice.


This implies that you are using the camera in auto mode.

Your first challenge, post-purchase, will be to learn enough to get out of auto mode. At least shutter priority so you can ensure sharp images.

So hold on to that note.

You may be technically proficient, but that may imply you have strong preferences. So if you have a choice, you might consider getting to a store to hold your candidates and work with them. Explore the menus. How does the camera feel in your hands (both of you)? You may find that one brand will stand out for you.

Your budget is entry level, but there are offerings from most of the manufacturers in that range. Keep in mind that you're probably buying into a system. So some homework and some effort are encouraged.

Finally, you can buy a camera body without the kit lens, and get a decent lens for it from day one. For example, a Nikon D3500 is on sale right now for $400, and the 50mm f/1.8G lens for $200. A lens that fast will serve you well in low light, offers a typical starting point for many, and is of high image quality. (The only thing you might want someday is an ND filter for shooting in bright light with a wide aperture... but that's the future.)

There are other choices (brands) available that line up with the above.


Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 3 weeks ago #685008 by KCook
  • Your first challenge, post-purchase, will be to learn enough to get out of auto mode. At least shutter priority so you can ensure sharp images.
Agreed :cheers:

Also, besides exposure settings, there is manual focus to explore.  Try to predict the likely distance of the child for the shot.  Carefully set the lens to that distance.  Then wait for the child to put her/his self at that distance.  Sometimes called zone focusing.  This will work even in extreme darkness.  With skill and luck of course.

And flash can be an absolute game changer.  The brief flash duration provides a super quick "shutter" speed.  And the kit lens will be fine, no need for an extra fast lens.  Doesn't your D40 have built-in flash?

Kelly

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 3 weeks ago #685009 by Nberry1954
That's correct, we used it in Auto for the first few attempts and then researched a little on how to operate it manually, we're definitely still learning, but we did see an immediate change going manual. I think 6MP is a little restrictive, and an upgrade is needed. We're planning on going to a store this weekend and trying some out. We're both researching tons, but having words from experience is always gold compared to review sites. I appreciate all of you for taking time to reply to the post.


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,

802.3K

205K

1.62M

  • Facebook

    802,251 / Likes

  • Twitter

    205,000 / Followers

  • Google+

    1,620,816 / Followers

Latest Reviews

In this Fujifilm X-E3 review, learn about the specs, features, pros, cons, and more of this excellent entry-level mirrorless camera.

Aug 05, 2020

In this Nikon D500 vs Nikon D7500 matchup, we explore the features and specs, pros and cons, and prices of these older, but highly capable DSLRs.

Jun 22, 2020

Check out this Sony a7R IV review to learn all about this incredible camera's specs, features, image quality, price, and more.

Jun 15, 2020

The Panasonic Lumix S1 might be a few years old, but its features and specs (and its used price today) make it worth a long, hard look.

Jun 08, 2020

Forum Top Posters

Latest Articles

With this list of gifts for photographers under $250, you have tons of great holiday gift ideas for the photographer on your list!

Aug 06, 2020

photo album, photo album features, best photo album, photo album layout

Aug 05, 2020

The Canon EOS 80D is several years old, but it has some great specs and features that still make it a solid choice in 2020.

Aug 05, 2020

In this Fujifilm X-E3 review, learn about the specs, features, pros, cons, and more of this excellent entry-level mirrorless camera.

Aug 05, 2020

A great way to supplement your income is to sell stock photos. The question is, how do you sell photos online? Use these tips to increase stock photography sales.

Aug 04, 2020

Our upcoming photography trek and adventure series will provide you with actionable steps you can take to improve your photography and get ready for outdoor adventures of your own.

Aug 04, 2020

Not sure how to use your camera as a webcam? Use this guide to learn how to set up a DSLR or mirrorless camera with your computer.

Aug 04, 2020

A common question beginner photographers have is, what are step up rings? Learn what they are, why they're valuable, and where you can get a next-generation step up ring.

Aug 04, 2020