shutter speed guidline

9 years 9 months ago #41502 by themofo
What are the general guidlines for shutterspeed when the camera is handheld?


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9 years 9 months ago #41508 by chasrich
Anything as slow as 1/60th I try to brace myself and do other things to stabilize the shot. If you are moving or panning or otherwise unstable go for as fast as the shot will allow. I'm sure there might be other guidelines but this is the one in the front of my mind.

“Amateurs worry about equipment, professionals worry about money, masters worry about light, I just make pictures… ” ~ Vernon Trent

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9 years 9 months ago #41658 by Pops
Another guideline is that you shoot with a shutter speed no lower than the focal length of your lens. While this is not so important on the shorter lenses, it comes into play when you are shooting with the longer ones. Particularly those over 100mm.

Pops


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9 years 9 months ago - 9 years 9 months ago #41688 by effron

Why so serious?
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The following user(s) said Thank You: Cre8tivefix, Zardoz

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9 years 9 months ago #41689 by chasrich
:goodpost: :judge: Both links hit it...

“Amateurs worry about equipment, professionals worry about money, masters worry about light, I just make pictures… ” ~ Vernon Trent

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9 years 9 months ago #41693 by Baydream

Pops wrote: Another guideline is that you shoot with a shutter speed no lower than the focal length of your lens. While this is not so important on the shorter lenses, it comes into play when you are shooting with the longer ones. Particularly those over 100mm.

Pops

:agree:

Shoot, learn and share. It will make you a better photographer.
fineartamerica.com/profiles/john-g-schickler.html?tab=artwork

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9 years 9 months ago #41694 by Baydream

effron wrote: If you have a minute or two, here's a read.......
www.sederquist.com/claexpos.html
and
www.scrapjazz.com/topics/Photography/Lessons/530.php

:goodpost: I have bookmarked both of these as learning tools. Both well written and to the point. Thanks.

Shoot, learn and share. It will make you a better photographer.
fineartamerica.com/profiles/john-g-schickler.html?tab=artwork

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9 years 8 months ago - 9 years 8 months ago #48034 by Henry Peach
I recommend personal testing. These days digital makes that very easy. Some folks are just more stable than others.

The often quoted advice is minimum safe hand held speed is 1/focal length. I've been disappointed in sharpness using that advice many times, and prefer to double or triple that speed when I can. Even then I sometimes get camera shake with extremely high shutter speeds. On the other hand sometimes I can do just fine at very slow shutter speeds. It can depend on how I'm standing, whether I'm tired or not, whether I've been drinking coffee or beer, how heavy the lens is, if the wind is blowing hard, all sorts of things....

How you are holding the camera is very important. Look up advice on that, and pay attention to how you are holding the camera. Even after 20 years I sometimes quickly bring the camera up to my eye, and start shooting away without making sure I've got the camera properly braced. You don't see the problem until you get home and start processing.

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9 years 8 months ago #51266 by ToadSlayer
The old 'rule of thumb' handheld minimum shutter speed to be not less than lens focal length - was for 35mm full frame. If you are using a digital crop sensor, then the minimum shutter speed should be increased by at least x 1.6.

So ............. with say a 100 mm lens, the minimum shutter speed for hand-held use should be 1/160 of a second.


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