How can I get my photos to look like this when shot indoors

8 years 10 months ago #220493 by Jeannie_Cee
I dread indoor photos due to the fact that they always look orange and probably because the lens I use has not got a wide enough aperture but this still shouldn't stop me from taking indoor photos that look like this.


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8 years 10 months ago #220499 by john_m
It probably has more to do with using speedlights and some great post processing skills than it does with the lens used. Those are some really nice photos! Do you use external lighting while shooting indoors? Using off camera flash works wonders

Nikon D200
Nikon 50mm f1.8D, Tokina 28-80 f2.8, Nikon 75-300, Sigma 18-200, Nikon SB-600, Nikon SB-25, Promaster triggers

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8 years 10 months ago #220506 by mattmoran
:agree:
Also, if your indoor photos look orange, it means the white balance is not right. If you shoot raw you can fix it in post processing, but if you shoot jpeg you need to get it right when you take the picture. Most people leave it set at "AWB" which is hit or miss. For indoor shots you want one of the lightbulbs, depending on the type of lighting in the room.

-Matt

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8 years 10 months ago #220517 by KCook

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

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8 years 10 months ago - 8 years 10 months ago #220838 by Henry Peach
Well first of all the room in the example shots is like the most perfect indoor, natural light shooting situation you could ever encounter: Two walls that are effectively giant softboxes, and everything is painted white. This might as well be a portrait studio. I think anyone with any camera could get shots like this in this sort of lighting, as long as they understand that the meter is going to get fooled by all the white (it will want to underexpose to make it all middle gray, add positive exposure comp or manually set camera).

As said the orange is a white balance issue. The tungsten wb setting on the camera is for tungsten photoflood bulbs not household tungsten bulbs. Photoflood bulbs are so bright they heat up a room pretty quick, and might give the subjects a tan. Household bulbs are even more orange. With my DSLRs auto-wb rarely goes blue enough to eliminate the orange from household bulbs. Either set a custom wb at the scene, or adjust in processing.

My favorite trick for dealing with icky color I can't seem to correct is to go BW. :)

Using a flash can help. Flash light is white, and over powers the local orange lighting. At least your closer subjects are more normal colored, and there is a warm glow in the background. Bounce the flash off the ceiling, and it looks like regular room lighting (or even softer).

For indoor wedding receptions I put an orange gel on my flash, and aim it at the ceiling with a homemade bounce card on the back. I set the wb to tungsten and I'm shooting raw. This makes the flash light a similar color as the tungsten room lights, and when I correct in the raw processor foreground and background all look a more natural color.

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8 years 10 months ago #220843 by john_m
:goodpost:
I agree with this guy haha.

Nikon D200
Nikon 50mm f1.8D, Tokina 28-80 f2.8, Nikon 75-300, Sigma 18-200, Nikon SB-600, Nikon SB-25, Promaster triggers

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8 years 10 months ago - 8 years 10 months ago #220860 by FedererPhoto
Henry nailed it.

Different light has different color. Daylight tends to skew blue, tungsten tends to skew orange, flourescent tends to skew green, dusk/night/shadow tends to skew blue, etc... our eyes/brain compensate for this and we see white as white as white until things get pretty crazy (and even then our brain tends to do well). But our camera doesn't know anything other than what you tell it. You need to tell it "Hey, I'm shooting in tungsten lighting right now" for it to make the compensation our brains make automatically.

By maniupulating the various colors of light, you can get things to 'match' or you can get things to contrast. Light from a flash is historically matched to sunlight by default... As Henry said, you can put a orange-colored gel (which is really just a piece of celophane-looking stuff that's tinted) in front of your flash... this will make both the ambient light (tungsten) and the flash-based light (which has been gelled to match the tungsten) the same color. Then you can tell your camera, "This room is lit with orange light".... and your camera will skew everything such that whites come out white and the colors will all match nicely.
The opposite approach can also add contrast and highlight a particular part of a scene. The second-to-last image in this engagement photograph session blog post shows this effect. The water was trending bluish as the dusk wore on (it was pretty dark for this shot - 1/2" shutter, f/2.8) ... enough so that the light coming from my flash was actually 'warmer' than the ambient light on the falls. So when I hit the couple with a spot light and had the camera set to define "flash-based-light as white" the falls themselves rendered blue.

Learning the different color temperatures of light will help in being able to effectively work with indoor light (where mixed sources are very common and 'auto white balance' tends to no do very well)


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