A question about UV, Haze, and Clear filters

9 years 11 months ago #35889 by fotozone
I am new to the world of DSLR cameras. I just upgraded to a Nikon D3100 from a Olympus Sp590. I have been told to always keep a UV filter on my lenses to protect them, when I went to get the UV filter I saw that there are also Haze-1, Skylight, and Clear. I started trying to research this and now I am more confused. I read in several places that UV filters are unnecessary on a DSLR that it is built in to the sensor. A few articles recommend not using any filters because of lens flare. I do a lot of high elevation shooting and with my Olympus hazy horizons was a big problem. So my question is this what filter do you recommend for everyday shooting? One more question; I also read to get a step up filter so you only need one set of filters to my novice brain this makes sense. Is there any reason not to do this?

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9 years 11 months ago #35900 by Baydream
UV, Sky and Clear filters primarily protect your lens from getting scratched (an expensive injury). With a good quality lens, effects should be minimal. In the odd situation that you might get flare, you can always remove the filter, shoot, then replace it. I have a skylight one and a UV on the other lens.
As for size: If you have or are getter lenses of various sizes, the step up would benefit you but you would need different lens caps and may not be able to use lens hoods to control flare. In addition, the larger filters are usually more expensive. For your "protective" lenses, getter filters to match makes sense. If you have 58mm lenses and get a 52mm prime, get a step up for using filters like polarizers that can run into money.

For those hazy horizons, a circular polarizer may help.

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9 years 11 months ago #35966 by Joves

Baydream wrote: UV, Sky and Clear filters primarily protect your lens from getting scratched (an expensive injury). With a good quality lens, effects should be minimal. In the odd situation that you might get flare, you can always remove the filter, shoot, then replace it. I have a skylight one and a UV on the other lens.
As for size: If you have or are getter lenses of various sizes, the step up would benefit you but you would need different lens caps and may not be able to use lens hoods to control flare. In addition, the larger filters are usually more expensive. For your "protective" lenses, getter filters to match makes sense. If you have 58mm lenses and get a 52mm prime, get a step up for using filters like polarizers that can run into money.

For those hazy horizons, a circular polarizer may help.

:goodpost:
I personally only use the Clears as protection.The sensors on digitals already filter for UV through the filter on it.


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9 years 11 months ago #36013 by Stealthy Ninja
A hood will protect your lens more than a filter ever will. In fact if you drop your lens, the filter might shatter and damage the front element.

The front element is pretty darn strong and unless you want to prevent damage from sand/sea-spray etc. they're probably not necessary.

Personally I have some lenses with them some without (70-200 has one on, the 24-70 doesn't right now, the 14-24 can't and the 50mm 1.4 from Sigma doesn't). Often I forget to put them back on after I use a CP.

Like Baydream suggested, if you do use them, get the best quality you can, to avoid any possible deterioration in the IQ.

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9 years 11 months ago #36961 by Joves

Stealthy Ninja wrote: A hood will protect your lens more than a filter ever will. In fact if you drop your lens, the filter might shatter and damage the front element.

The front element is pretty darn strong and unless you want to prevent damage from sand/sea-spray etc. they're probably not necessary.

Personally I have some lenses with them some without (70-200 has one on, the 24-70 doesn't right now, the 14-24 can't and the 50mm 1.4 from Sigma doesn't). Often I forget to put them back on after I use a CP.

Like Baydream suggested, if you do use them, get the best quality you can, to avoid any possible deterioration in the IQ.


Normally for many people this is true but I rock climb with my camera alot and have had some parts of cliffs get past the hoods. I shattered a few filters, now granted it owuld have only been a minor scratch on a lens but, better to shatter a filter.


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9 years 11 months ago #36963 by Baydream

Joves wrote:

Stealthy Ninja wrote: A hood will protect your lens more than a filter ever will. In fact if you drop your lens, the filter might shatter and damage the front element.

The front element is pretty darn strong and unless you want to prevent damage from sand/sea-spray etc. they're probably not necessary.

Personally I have some lenses with them some without (70-200 has one on, the 24-70 doesn't right now, the 14-24 can't and the 50mm 1.4 from Sigma doesn't). Often I forget to put them back on after I use a CP.

Like Baydream suggested, if you do use them, get the best quality you can, to avoid any possible deterioration in the IQ.


Normally for many people this is true but I rock climb with my camera alot and have had some parts of cliffs get past the hoods. I shattered a few filters, now granted it owuld have only been a minor scratch on a lens but, better to shatter a filter.

:goodpost: Small price to pay.

Shoot, learn and share. It will make you a better photographer.
fineartamerica.com/profiles/john-g-schickler.html?tab=artwork

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