A Kite!!!

9 years 6 months ago #110119 by Dori
Finally! Got a somewhat decent shot!! :woohoo:


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9 years 6 months ago - 9 years 6 months ago #110136 by MLKstudios
Nice shot. Ween shooting with backlight, I usually add a bit to the exposure. An extra 1/3rd or 2/3rds of a stop (using CWA mode) would bring more light to the face. No way to know how much matrix/evaluative is adding for you. All you can do is hope it gets it right.

Matthew

PS or you could "fix it in post". ;)

Matthew L Kees
MLK Studios Photography School
www.MLKstudios.com
[email protected]
"Every artist, was once an amateur"

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9 years 6 months ago #110141 by Dori
I tinkered a bit, will try again.

What is 'CWA mode'?

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9 years 6 months ago - 9 years 6 months ago #110143 by MLKstudios
CWA == Center Weighted Averaging metering mode. It makes the scene a "middle gray" (it's based on 18% reflectance), and is something you can learn and be able to compensate for later.

Matrix (or Evaluative) is doing compensation for you. We just have no idea by how much. It could add a third of a stop to one shot and 2/3rds to the next.

But, we do know it keeps getting better at math.

Matthew ;)

PS I ask my students to use CWA metering, as it is something that can be learned. It's an OLD photographic standard.

Matthew L Kees
MLK Studios Photography School
www.MLKstudios.com
[email protected]
"Every artist, was once an amateur"

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9 years 6 months ago #110144 by TheNissanMan
What type of Kite is that? This side of the pond we tend to get a lot of Red Kites to play with, I haven't seen a white one before.

They're a bit nuts over here so you can get them in the garden!


Although do try for them in the sky but need more practice :)


They are a tad curious?


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9 years 6 months ago - 9 years 6 months ago #110151 by Dori

MLKstudios wrote: CWA == Center Weighted Averaging metering mode. It makes the scene a "middle gray" (it's based on 18% reflectance), and is something you can learn and be able to compensate for later.

Matrix (or Evaluative) is doing compensation for you. We just have no idea by how much. It could add a third of a stop to one shot and 2/3rds to the next.

But, we do know it keeps getting better at math.

Matthew ;)

PS I ask my students to use CWA metering, as it is something that can be learned. It's an OLD photographic standard.


My Dad taught me that! I just didn't understand the abbreviation. That is where I goofed, I was using Matrix, Thanks!

TheNissanMan, it's called the Swallow Tail Kite. Beautiful to watch fly, they dance in the air with each other! Swallow Tail Kite

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9 years 6 months ago #110200 by photobod
Wonderful that you get such beautiful birds to photograph, good shooting. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

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"A good photograph is one that communicate a fact, touches the heart, leaves the viewer a changed person for having seen it. It is, in a word, effective." - Irving Penn

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9 years 6 months ago #110209 by Dori
Thanks!! :)

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9 years 6 months ago - 9 years 6 months ago #110217 by MLKstudios
FYI anyone who tries to explain exposure while ignoring metering modes is another crumb gatherer. Not a master of photography. How we "pros" read (or interpret) the info given to us by the meter is completely based on the chosen metering mode. We first need to know what the meter is based on.

JMO Matthew ;)

Also a "creative exposure" is when you use a setting different than the one the camera gives you. Not one with the same EV based on reciprocity (another error in BP's book).

An example is photographing a couple at sunset on a beach. Do you subtract from the exposure to make a silhouette with a deep colored sky, or add to the exposure so you can see their faces -- or add a flash for fill so you can have both facial detail AND a deep sky? The answer is D) all the above. There is no one right answer but how YOU want the picture to look.

Or you can use the Green setting (with Matrix style metering) and let the camera decide for you.

Matthew L Kees
MLK Studios Photography School
www.MLKstudios.com
[email protected]
"Every artist, was once an amateur"

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9 years 6 months ago #110247 by Dori

FYI anyone who tries to explain exposure while ignoring metering modes is another crumb gatherer. Not a master of photography. How we "pros" read (or interpret) the info given to us by the meter is completely based on the chosen metering mode. We first need to know what the meter is based on.

Ok, call me a pinhead but you lost me here.;)

Or you can use the Green setting (with Matrix style metering) and let the camera decide for you.

That is what I used, how would center-weighted have improved it??

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9 years 6 months ago - 9 years 6 months ago #110251 by MLKstudios
That was a BP slam. He doesn't cover metering modes BEFORE talking about metering. His glorified UE book has NO foundation.

Was my attempt to keep the blind from leading the blind.

CWA is a photographic standard (based on 18% reflectance). It can be learned and later adjusted from when used as a basis for exposure readings. Matrix metering also has no foundation, and there is no way to "guess" by how much you need to adjust from a Matrix style indication. You just have to trust it is doing the right thing. That it is making the correct compensation for you.

Does that make sense?

Matthew

Matthew L Kees
MLK Studios Photography School
www.MLKstudios.com
[email protected]
"Every artist, was once an amateur"

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9 years 6 months ago #110257 by Dori

That was a BP slam. He doesn't cover metering modes BEFORE talking about metering. His teaching method has NO foundation.

I see.

CWA is a photographic standard (based on 18% reflectance). It can be learned and later adjusted from when used as a basis for exposure readings. Matrix metering also has no foundation, and there is no way to "guess" by how much you need to adjust from a Matrix style indication.

Does that make sense?

I have read many writings on metering/exposure, my Dad's books, online etc. Asked many questions, but I still don't 'get' it. :unsure:

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9 years 6 months ago - 9 years 6 months ago #110261 by MLKstudios
Matrix style metering began by dividing the frame into 5 "zones". Each zone was measured separately. There was a middle zone, upper left, upper right, lower left and lower right.

Those five readings then got compared to pics in the camera's memory taken by professionals (who knew how to compensate for CWA exposure readings). If for example, the upper left and right were a few stops over the lower left and right and middle (ex. could happen in a picture of a house), then there was some exposure added to what would be a CWA reading that "averages" all the tones in the frame at once. And the result was a brighter foreground (similar to the shadow under your bird which should have some exposure added).

Later Nikon (and others) added more zones (over 1000 now) and more sample pics in the database. It also considers what is in focus using data from the lens and colors, in 3D color matrix metering! So even your bird pic would get some additional exposure.

But, we don't know what sample pic it chose. And out of thousands, it could pick one for one frame and another for the next. There is simply no "standard" to base a Matrix reading on. We can only HOPE it gets it right.

Better?

Matthew

Matthew L Kees
MLK Studios Photography School
www.MLKstudios.com
[email protected]
"Every artist, was once an amateur"

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9 years 6 months ago #110266 by Dori
Ok, so Matrix averages the reflected light in the entire scene?

in other words, I should have CWA metered? But, where is the metering done, in the center? Where my focus point usually is??? Or am I still being dense.

I do appreciate your effort to help me:)

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9 years 6 months ago - 9 years 6 months ago #110267 by MLKstudios
I edited my post above to try and make it clearer. Read it again.

CWA "averages". Matrix "samples" parts of the scene and uses a computer database to indicate to the camera the correct exposure.

Matthew

And yes, if you used CWA metering, you know the scene is brighter than 18%, so you would know to add to the exposure (to look like it does in nature).

It's what we HOPE matrix metering will do for us.

Matthew L Kees
MLK Studios Photography School
www.MLKstudios.com
[email protected]
"Every artist, was once an amateur"

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