Remote triggering of strobes?

9 years 1 month ago #189679 by Bobby
If you are using a radio remote trigger with multiple monolights, is it necessary or just beneficial to have a receiver on All of the lights? All lights are equipped with slaves

Is there really any advantage to using a remote trigger over the on camera flash?

I'm assuming if the camera flash is set to the lowest setting that will trigger the slaves, the camera flash will not be visible in the image?


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9 years 1 month ago #189681 by Rolly
The huge advantage of using triggers is that you don't have to rely upon the light hitting the slaves to trigger your flash. Inside, in a studio setting, it's not a huge deal but the triggers are still a better idea so there is no extra light in the image-- besides, it saves a lot of batteries, etc, to use a dedicated trigger. If you are trying to use lights outside, or in a large space you really need the triggers because otherwise you spend the whole time trying to hit the slave with your flash. Having triggers on every light means that you don't have to worry about the lights getting set off by stray light and you don't have to make sure that the light from one strobe hits the slave of the next. In the studio, it's not a big deal at all. On location, it can be a bit limiting.


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9 years 1 month ago #189682 by Bobby
Basically what happened is I've ordered a two head kit and a transmitter with two receivers.

My plan was to wait and "see" how the two heads worked but before they arrived I've decided to order a larger "main" light


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9 years 1 month ago - 9 years 1 month ago #189683 by Henry Peach
Radio triggers are generally considered more reliable than optical triggers. They work at farther ranges, don't need line of sight, aren't troubled by bright or high contrast lighting situations, etc...

If using an on-camera flash to trigger other flashes it just depends on the situation as to whether the on-camera flash will affect lighting. As long as it's 3+ stops below the overall exposure level it probably won't show, but it just depends on how the subject is lit.

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9 years 1 month ago #189685 by mattmoran

Bobby wrote: I'm assuming if the camera flash is set to the lowest setting that will trigger the slaves, the camera flash will not be visible in the image?


That's the crux of it, isn't it? Also, where is the slave sensor on your monolights? Can you set it up so that the on camera flash is bright enough to trigger the slave sensor, but not bright enough to affect the image?

May work fine in a dark room. What if you are using your monolights as fill flash on a bright sunny day?

Personally, I don't use an on camera flash. I use a cord from my camera to one of the lights and trigger the rest with the slave. And I've never tried it outside, so I don't know how it would work.

There is no "right" or "wrong" way to do it. Just trial and error.

-Matt

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9 years 1 month ago #189687 by Sha Nea
I would think that you would only need multiple receivers when you are shooting in a situation where other people are shooting with flash. You wouldn't want their flashes setting off your lights...and most lights will disable their optical trigger when something is plugged into their triggering connection.


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9 years 1 month ago #189688 by Bobby
Thanks everybody for your help. :)


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