How long did it take you to figure out your style?

8 years 6 months ago #240628 by KCook
Well, my preference in subject matter is still evolving, going on a half century now. Subject matter that is of zero interest to me came much quicker.

old crank

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
8 years 6 months ago #240631 by Joves

TheNissanMan wrote: From reading this thread it appears that people are talking about area's of photography rather than styles ie People, nature, sports with the exception of Dori who mentioned shallow DOF etc...

I would interpret a style as a type of shot within a Genre, for example when shooting drifting I try and get as slow a shutter as possible whereas others will try and freeze the action.

In terms of style I guess it depends on what you are shooting for.

My style, it depends on what I am shooting and what I have learnt so far, I have a hell of a lot to learn so until I comfortable shooting in all the genre's I would like to shoot there is no way I could apply a style to my shooting...

But I still have no style in particular. Style is a repeating type of shooting where you have a certain look to your work. That I do not have, I only have a perspective that I see that makes the subject appear as I want it. Which varies with the conditions and the subject. Unless I post a photo in here, you would never see one of my photos and say Joves shot that if you were in a gallery.


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
8 years 6 months ago #240674 by TheNissanMan
That is a different question :)

I bought my camera in Feb 2010 with the aim of shooting motorsport but ended up shooting wildlife, it was only september of last year where I got real access to my first motorsport event and now attend events where ever I can :)


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
8 years 6 months ago #240686 by Rob pix4u2
My preference in subjects is primarily ice hockey , which I shoot most, then american football, baseball, and landscape/cityscape. I don't get enough sunrise/sunset work or portrait work.

Remember to engage brain before putting mouth in gear
Rob Huelsman Sr.
My Facebook www.facebook.com/ImaginACTIONPhotography

Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
8 years 6 months ago #240763 by icepics
How long did it take? - I have no idea. But I think as you go along you're drawn to whatever interests you, and as you learn and try different things you figure out what you're good at.

I had planned to go into journalism til I worked at a summer camp and decided to become a special ed. teacher, but maybe my interest in writing and journalism helped develop a somewhat journalistic style. And my style probably developed because of my way of seeing something to photograph, and capturing it as it happens, and with practice over time getting better at framing and composing pictures pretty quickly.

I don't do wildlife and landscapes because by the time a photographer who's good at that would be still setting up the tripod, viewing the scene, etc. I'd have shot a roll of film and be in the car ready to go. Everybody has their own ways of taking pictures I think, and for you John you're already figuring out you're good at working with people and at capturing a moment, whether it's at an event or during a portrait session - you're seeing it and learning when to release the shutter just at the right time and getting better at capturing the moment consisitently.

And Joves I think you do have a style, look at how many of your photos show some pattern or texture - pattern in clouds or a snow covered creekbed, or equipment and the shadows made, or texture in a stack of wood or a flower. It may not be easy to name or define the style, but there's a recurring use of pattern and texture in your photos that shows what you see in what you're photographing.

Rob I think photos like the one you posted are portraits of a sort, I think of them as in-game or event portraits I guess you could call them - to me they're portraits captured as a moment in time in a real-life setting. Some of your photos may not be considered landscapes but yet a river scene with fireworks is a landscape of sorts, just captured as part of an event.

Sharon
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
8 years 6 months ago #240768 by Scotty

icepics wrote: How long did it take? - I have no idea. But I think as you go along you're drawn to whatever interests you, and as you learn and try different things you figure out what you're good at.

I had planned to go into journalism til I worked at a summer camp and decided to become a special ed. teacher, but maybe my interest in writing and journalism helped develop a somewhat journalistic style. And my style probably developed because of my way of seeing something to photograph, and capturing it as it happens, and with practice over time getting better at framing and composing pictures pretty quickly.

I don't do wildlife and landscapes because by the time a photographer who's good at that would be still setting up the tripod, viewing the scene, etc. I'd have shot a roll of film and be in the car ready to go. Everybody has their own ways of taking pictures I think, and for you John you're already figuring out you're good at working with people and at capturing a moment, whether it's at an event or during a portrait session - you're seeing it and learning when to release the shutter just at the right time and getting better at capturing the moment consisitently.

And Joves I think you do have a style, look at how many of your photos show some pattern or texture - pattern in clouds or a snow covered creekbed, or equipment and the shadows made, or texture in a stack of wood or a flower. It may not be easy to name or define the style, but there's a recurring use of pattern and texture in your photos that shows what you see in what you're photographing.

Rob I think photos like the one you posted are portraits of a sort, I think of them as in-game or event portraits I guess you could call them - to me they're portraits captured as a moment in time in a real-life setting. Some of your photos may not be considered landscapes but yet a river scene with fireworks is a landscape of sorts, just captured as part of an event.


Do me next.:cheers:

When the last candle has been blown out
and the last glass of champagne has been drunk
All that you are left with are the memories and the images-David Cooke.

Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
8 years 6 months ago #240971 by crystal
From the start many years ago I knew I loved shooting nature. I only decided to shoot portraits/weddings/events just to make some money, but I really do not like shooting that field....so I stopped. Nature is what I love, and with some exploring I have found ways to sell my photos and it's working for me. I enjoy shooting all aspects of nature... landscapes, wildlife, flowers/macro. What that style is, I have no idea, I just shoot what I love.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
8 years 6 months ago #240995 by John37
Very cool that it's working out so well for you. I wish I had an eye for nature and landscapes. But in those areas I seem to lose any spark of inspiration I may have. I have the will, but not the imagination to back it up. Perhaps I will develop a better sense for it as I progress. :)

"The most endangered species? The honest man!"

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
8 years 6 months ago #241004 by Scotty

crystal wrote: From the start many years ago I knew I loved shooting nature. I only decided to shoot portraits/weddings/events just to make some money, but I really do not like shooting that field....so I stopped. Nature is what I love, and with some exploring I have found ways to sell my photos and it's working for me. I enjoy shooting all aspects of nature... landscapes, wildlife, flowers/macro. What that style is, I have no idea, I just shoot what I love.


So where's your shots from your last trip? :X

When the last candle has been blown out
and the last glass of champagne has been drunk
All that you are left with are the memories and the images-David Cooke.

Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
8 years 6 months ago #241021 by Baydream
I seem to like wildlife best, then landscape. But while doing this, I see people doing interesting things, including taking photos. I still like to experiment with most other subjects except formal portraits and weddings. Tried those a bit and just didn't "feel it".
My interest evolve all the time and recently did some experiment with changing lights, like LEDs and glow sticks. Some fun.

Shoot, learn and share. It will make you a better photographer.
fineartamerica.com/profiles/john-g-schickler.html?tab=artwork

Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
8 years 6 months ago #241051 by Joves

icepics wrote: And Joves I think you do have a style, look at how many of your photos show some pattern or texture - pattern in clouds or a snow covered creekbed, or equipment and the shadows made, or texture in a stack of wood or a flower. It may not be easy to name or define the style, but there's a recurring use of pattern and texture in your photos that shows what you see in what you're photographing.


Well I do not really consider it so much a style some may though but Thank-You for noticing a pattern. Now I feel like Im in a rut. :rofl:


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,

802.3K

205K

  • Facebook

    802,251 / Likes

  • Twitter

    205,000 / Followers

  • Google+

    1,620,816 / Followers

Latest Reviews

The Sony a6100 has been out for over a year now. In this long-term Sony a6100 review, learn all about its features, specs, price, and more.

Jan 13, 2021

The Panasonic G85 might be a few years old, but it still has the specs and features to make it a highly useful camera. Get all the details in this Panasonic G85 review.

Jan 12, 2021

The Olympus OM-D E-M1 I is pushing eight years old, but for budget-minded photographers, it represents excellent value in 2021.

Jan 08, 2021

The Fujifilm X100v is the latest in the X100 series of compact cameras. Does this new version improve on its predecessors? Find out in this in-depth review.

Dec 31, 2020

Forum Top Posters

Latest Articles

Processing landscape photos takes a good amount of time and effort. By educating yourself on tips for processing landscape photos, you can make the most of your editing time.

Jan 14, 2021

I got my first metal print from Printique about six weeks ago. In this Printique metal print review, learn why this might be the best metal print I've ever gotten.

Jan 13, 2021

Use these highly effective real estate photography tips to take better images of properties that help improve its chances of getting sold.

Jan 13, 2021

The Sony a6100 has been out for over a year now. In this long-term Sony a6100 review, learn all about its features, specs, price, and more.

Jan 13, 2021

Use these photography ideas to find your creativity, get organized, and utilize your time at home wisely.

Jan 12, 2021

Cropping in photography is much more than resizing an image. Instead, learning how to crop landscape photos can greatly impact the quality of the composition.

Jan 12, 2021

The Panasonic G85 might be a few years old, but it still has the specs and features to make it a highly useful camera. Get all the details in this Panasonic G85 review.

Jan 12, 2021

There are plenty of camera settings for beginners to learn. However, these important camera settings should be at the top of your list.

Jan 08, 2021