Three Versions

8 years 1 month ago #269161 by John Landolfi
Following suggestions by Sharon and Sue, here are three versions of this image. Preferences/Comments?


Chicago, Rain by gianbur , on Flickr


Chicago,-rain--Lightened by gianbur , on Flickr


Chicago,-rain--B&W by gianbur , on Flickr


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8 years 1 month ago #269163 by sHe
Tough call, John. The colors are so nice in the first two versions, but my eye keeps going to the very bright - and 'boring' sky. I have been taught "when the sky is boring, leave it out or convert to black and white." thus, my thinking about converting.

It will be interesting to read what others have to say.


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8 years 1 month ago #269164 by KCook
I not a big fan of B&W, but I definitely prefer the B&W version here.

Kelly

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

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8 years 1 month ago #269180 by Stealthy Ninja
I like the black and white, but the grey in the background looks a tad strange. Overall I think I like number 1 the best.

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8 years 1 month ago - 8 years 1 month ago #269184 by Henry Peach

Stealthy Ninja wrote: Overall I think I like number 1 the best.


Me too.

The gray sky in the BW looks fake. I can see the tone of the real sky in all the reflections in the water and on the buildings. It's hard to fake a sky, especially near the horizon. Possibly copy one out of another photo if you have to. The reflections have to match the sky. I'd be inclined to work with the bright white sky, and do some burning and dodging to make the whole scene snap more.

It is recommended to generally avoid bright, white sky, but I don't think it's problem here. The high contrast, urban scene suits it. If I were at the location again I'd try taking a couple of steps to the right , and see how it looks solid buildings.

There is an optical illusion where it seems like the left third of the photo is significantly darker, and the dividing line seems almost artificial. Increasing the contrast to the left of the divide would lessen the illusion. Whether it's better or not? But probably worth looking at.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Stealthy Ninja

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8 years 1 month ago #269194 by Lightpuller
:agree: :goodpost:


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8 years 1 month ago #269223 by John Landolfi

Henry Peach wrote:

Stealthy Ninja wrote: Overall I think I like number 1 the best.


Me too.

The gray sky in the BW looks fake. I can see the tone of the real sky in all the reflections in the water and on the buildings. It's hard to fake a sky, especially near the horizon. Possibly copy one out of another photo if you have to. The reflections have to match the sky. I'd be inclined to work with the bright white sky, and do some burning and dodging to make the whole scene snap more.

It is recommended to generally avoid bright, white sky, but I don't think it's problem here. The high contrast, urban scene suits it. If I were at the location again I'd try taking a couple of steps to the right , and see how it looks solid buildings.

There is an optical illusion where it seems like the left third of the photo is significantly darker, and the dividing line seems almost artificial. Increasing the contrast to the left of the divide would lessen the illusion. Whether it's better or not? But probably worth looking at.


I agree with most of what you say, Matt. I prefer the first one myself, and also like the second, where I followed Sharon's suggestion and lightened that building a little. It isn't an optical illusion, but the shadow cast by the building on the right which was advancing on the street as the sun set behind an overcast sky, at close to 7pm. I tried Sue's suggestion to see what B&W would bring, and I tried to dramatize a bit too much. I'm reps[osting that one, having tried for a mofe realistic sky and reflections. Your further comments will be appreciated. :cheers:


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8 years 1 month ago - 8 years 1 month ago #269224 by John Landolfi
Here's the attempted correction- what do you think?




Chicago,-rain--B&W by gianbur , on Flickr


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8 years 1 month ago #269227 by Stealthy Ninja
That's better John. Looks like an old photo (apart from the cars).

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8 years 1 month ago #269276 by John Landolfi
Exactly, and I don't see much that B&W brings to it...


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8 years 1 month ago #269284 by Joves
I have to agree that the last photo has the good old time feel to it. I could not see the third in your first post to judge how much change has been done. But unfortunately for the color shots the sky is just too distracting. I would steal a nice gloomy sky from another photo for those. Granted a little more work but it could be worth it.


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8 years 1 month ago #269303 by icepics
I agree John I don't think it works all that well in B&W. Usually if I'm shooting B&W I tend to look at a scene for what will be black or white in a photo, and to see if there's potentially good contrast. Here I think it's a lot of midtones and not much dark or light except for the dark building that's not in the sunlight and doesn't have much contrast in it, and the bright hazy sky and reflections in the windows etc. - the rest I think is too much gray in similar tones. (Which sometimes can work but doesn't seem to in this case.)

I've learned to look for what will be white somewhere in the image other than in reflections and highlights. Black and white being the absence of color is going to leave you with the tones instead, but a grayish hazy sky in color is going to be gray and hazy in B&W too. If you drop in a darker sky, then where is that sunlight that's reflected in the windows?? you'd need to have a light source.

I find that if a sky doesn't look great I try to minimize the amount of it in a photo by changing my vantage point or my framing. I agree with Matt that in this case that slice of sky works with those tall buildings; if this photo showed too much of the sky it might not have looked at all good. Maybe just tinkering with some adjustment could get you the photo you want.

Sharon
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8 years 1 month ago #269304 by John Landolfi
Thanks for commenting, Dennis. If you scroll up to the beginning of the thread, you'll find the first B&W version (not that it warrants the trip...). I don't think swapping in a sky would have much to do with my intention with this shot. The colors and light were pretty much as in the first color one, and as I described, the sun was setting at 6:30 pm, or so, behind an overcast, and it was that light, including the sky, that greeted you as you turned the corner. Sharon's remark that she felt as if she were there is just what I was hoping to capture in an otherwise banal shot. :cheers: :thx2:


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8 years 1 month ago #269330 by Moe
#2 works for me


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8 years 1 month ago #269369 by John Landolfi
Thanks for commenting, Moe :cheers:


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