APS-C vs Four-Thirds mirrorless cameras

6 years 7 months ago #380073 by FunnyGuy
My D90 is close to the end  of it's life and I'm researching for a new camera and was noticing that APS-C and Four-Thirds mirrorless seem to be close to the same size.  However considering the sensor is larger on the APS-C, what is the attraction to four-thirds cameras?  


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
6 years 7 months ago - 6 years 7 months ago #380075 by MajorMagee
Four Thirds cameras are basically the same size and weight as APS-C because they're not mirrorless.

Micro Four Thirds cameras are mirrorless and are typically smaller and lighter than the equivalent APS-C.
They also tend to have much lighter lenses.

www.getolympus.com/us/en/digitalcameras/...ghbIuLRqjHq2bo_D_BwE

shop.panasonic.com/shop/cameras-and-camc...electedTopNavId=nav4


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
6 years 7 months ago #380215 by william_cpa
Four Thirds are lighter and less intimidating for some. The smaller sensor will limit your ability to achieve a shallow depth of field and you will not have worldwide access to a vast array of spectacularly good lenses

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
6 years 7 months ago - 6 years 7 months ago #380220 by MajorMagee
cache.olympusamerica.com/static/getolymp...les/lens_roadmap.pdf

photorumors.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/...nic-lens-roadmap.png

and then there are third party manufacturers...

But if I were you, I'd probably just stick with another Nikon and those lenses assuming you have a few good ones already.


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
6 years 7 months ago - 6 years 7 months ago #380221 by MajorMagee
Yes, getting a shallow depth of field with micro four thirds requires trick photography.










Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
6 years 7 months ago #380344 by Blake Vogt
Why is shallow depth of field with micro four thirds tricky? 


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
6 years 7 months ago - 6 years 7 months ago #380354 by MajorMagee
Here's a good explanation of all the issues.

www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/digi...mera-sensor-size.htm

There is a Depth of Field Calculator about half way down the page. For example a Micro Four Thirds camera with a 45mm lens at f/1.8 (a very popular lens) will produce the same angle of view and depth of field as an APS-C 56mm at f/2.3. It's the same concern of what you're giving up (or gaining) as going from Full Frame to APS-C.


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
6 years 7 months ago - 6 years 7 months ago #380369 by KCook

Blake Vogt wrote: Why is shallow depth of field with micro four thirds tricky? 


Nuttin tricky about it.  But, to get the same background blur as APS-C, you need to get the camera closer to the foreground subject.  Which may or may not be considered a difficulty.

When I want max background blur, I still use my APS-C DSLR.  APS-C choices for mirrorless are very tricky (unless you are already a fan of Canon EOS M, Fujifilm, Samsung, or Sony).  To wit -
  • Canon EOS M - No EVF model, extremely limited native lens selection
  • Fujifilm - Just plain expensive (at least in the USA market), limited zoom lens selection.
  • Samsung - Uhhh, right.  Samsung has never caught on in the USA market.  Lenses actually aren't bad, not so confident of the bodies.
  • Sony - Early NEX were very consumer focused, which started NEX off on the wrong foot.  Latest models are much improved, native lens selection is still hit-and-miss.
M4/3 is much simpler - Olympus rocks!  (Sorry Panny)

Kelly Cook

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
6 years 7 months ago #380379 by william_cpa

MajorMagee wrote: cache.olympusamerica.com/static/getolymp...les/lens_roadmap.pdf

photorumors.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/...nic-lens-roadmap.png

and then there are third party manufacturers...

But if I were you, I'd probably just stick with another Nikon and those lenses assuming you have a few good ones already.



This would be ideal for anyone wishing to buy the full range of lenses available. For those of us who rent equipment when needed, there are not too many bricks and mortar rental departments worldwide that stock these lenses. That would be an important factor for some when considering the purchase of a micro four thirds camera.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
5 years 4 months ago #453312 by KCook
I rented a Canon 760D and Oly E-M10 to make my own comparisons for IQ.  Here is a link to my findings for the more common Landscape modes -

Canon 760D vs Olympus E-M10: Landscape controls 

Kelly

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
5 years 4 months ago #453315 by Shadowfixer1
I have been shooting m43 since July of 2014 and have come to realize that the "you can't get decent background blur" to largely be BS. The same principles apply. Isolate your subject and make sure the background is a good distance away and you will get good isolation results. The size and weight advantage is a major factor in choosing m43. I have a Nikon D200 and I haven't used it since buying my Olympus EM-10. The range of lenses available are very good and generally much cheaper than other lenses. The big limitation is in very long lenses. There are some scheduled to come out but at the moment the ones available are pretty good consumer grade lenses. I'm talking about lenses over 300mm. The Oly Pro 40-150 with the available convertor will get you out to 420mm with superb quality but it is pricey. I just purchased the 75mm 1.8 Oly lens and all I can say is WOW. It's one of the sharpest lenses I've ever seen.

I had the urge the last couple of weeks to go with a Sony full frame. The only one I looked at was the Sony A7. It is the original and the cheapest. I went to Best Buy and they let me shoot some with my card in it. I processed the images and knew right then that I was staying with my OLY. The difference was nearly undetectable and in some instances, the Oly outperformed the A7 in my eyes. I have no doubt the newer A7's would do much better but the cost and limited lens choice at this time makes the Sony a no go for me.  The m43 system is a dang good system. The largest drawback to mirrorless at this time is focusing for action shots. The more expensive cameras are capable but not quite up to DSLR's yet. I have yet to try action shots with my EM-10 yet, but plan on a trip to the skateboard park very soon to see what it will do. Good luck in your choice.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
5 years 4 months ago #453316 by Shadowfixer1
I'll add one more thing. The "what you see is what you get" image in the viewfinder is a MAJOR advantage over DSLR's. You know what the exposure will look like before you snap it and can adjust accordingly.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
5 years 4 months ago #453324 by KCook
THANK YOU for the A7 comparison :cheers:

The A7 also tempted me, a little.  But my thinking is that by the time Sony finally gets the A7, and lens lineup, squared away Canon or Nikon will likely get serious about mirrorless.  And all of today's fine calculations will be out the window!

I just took two E-M5s with 4 lenses on a scenic vacation.  This made a sweet setup, with less lens changing thanks to the 2nd body (rented).  No way I would have lugged that much gear along in the DSLR size.

oldbones

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,

802.3K

205K

  • Facebook

    802,251 / Likes

  • Twitter

    205,000 / Followers

  • Google+

    1,620,816 / Followers

Latest Reviews

In this FujiFilm X-A7 review, learn why this camera is an excellent entry-level option for beginner photographers.

Jan 18, 2021

The Sony a6100 has been out for over a year now. In this long-term Sony a6100 review, learn all about its features, specs, price, and more.

Jan 13, 2021

The Panasonic G85 might be a few years old, but it still has the specs and features to make it a highly useful camera. Get all the details in this Panasonic G85 review.

Jan 12, 2021

The Olympus OM-D E-M1 I is pushing eight years old, but for budget-minded photographers, it represents excellent value in 2021.

Jan 08, 2021

Forum Top Posters

Latest Articles

Text messaging for business can help you in many ways, from keeping in touch with clients to sending invoices to get paid. Learn other benefits in this photography business guide.

Jan 18, 2021

In this FujiFilm X-A7 review, learn why this camera is an excellent entry-level option for beginner photographers.

Jan 18, 2021

Not everyone is comfortable in front of the camera, but with these portrait photography tips, you'll learn surefire ways to help models relax and have fun.

Jan 18, 2021

It's easy to be inspired in photography, but sometimes you need some photography exercises to regain that creativity. Learn a few creative photography ideas in this guide.

Jan 18, 2021

One of the best things you can do for your photography business is to make it easier for your clients to pay you. Learn how you can do that with these simple photography business tips.

Jan 15, 2021

Canon EF lenses have a long-standing reputation for quality. And with an EF-RF adapter, you can continue using your EF lenses with an EOS R body.

Jan 15, 2021

Processing landscape photos takes a good amount of time and effort. By educating yourself on tips for processing landscape photos, you can make the most of your editing time.

Jan 14, 2021

I got my first metal print from Printique about six weeks ago. In this Printique metal print review, learn why this might be the best metal print I've ever gotten.

Jan 13, 2021