Question for you to ponder about your camera settings

5 years 1 month ago #458386 by Melissa Zui
I've been meaning to ask this.  Assuming everything else in the cameras controls are all set, why wouldn't you us the lowest possible ISO that you can?  If you don't need the extra speed, and are not in a rush time wise, why not use the lowest ISO that your camera is able too? 

For the record, I know I haven't been doing this.  Generally because I'm lazy, which I can't imagine everyone is wired the same way I am.  lol 

just a Saturday morning thought that was bugging me.  Let me know what you think about this.  

-M 


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5 years 1 month ago #458402 by garyrhook
I think using the lowest possible ISO is generally recommended. However... the native ISO of a given camera isn't necessarily the lowest number. Or some I am to understand.

That said, one problem with low ISO + long exposure is sensor heat, which can create noise. Which obviates the point of low ISO.

So balance is called for, I think.


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5 years 1 month ago #458447 by Allen D
Now if you using lowest ISO with higher shutter speeds, won't that cause some adverse effects?  


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5 years 1 month ago #458449 by Hassner
The only problem I see will be the price of your lens and depth of field for your shot.
Little light with low ISO.
Little light with fast shutter speed.
Wide aperture for more light, little in focus.


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5 years 1 month ago #458457 by effron
Yeah, all of above. Myself its all about a shutter speed and maintaining the desired aperture, of course. (I thought it was a trick question.)
Whenever my camera is on the tripod the ISO is always at 100 (native).....;)

Why so serious?
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5 years 1 month ago #458504 by KCook

effron wrote: Yeah, all of above. Myself its all about a shutter speed and maintaining the desired aperture, of course. (I thought it was a trick question.)
Whenever my camera is on the tripod the ISO is always at 100 (native).....;)


+ 1

The vast majority of my shots are handheld, aperture or shutter priority, even for landscapes.  In good light I want the ISO to be under 400, but I don't have a fit just because it's not 100.  With a tripod I am more likely to take my time and dial in all the ideal settings, including ISO.

lazy

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

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5 years 1 month ago - 5 years 1 month ago #458515 by icepics
I'm not sure what you mean by not needing the extra speed or not being in a rush. I determine settings by using the meter and the situation, if I need a fast shutter speed shooting action or movement or if I want a larger or smaller aperture for more or less depth of field. I don't know of any reason to use a high ISO unless needed due to the conditions (raising it in lower light or to be able to use a faster shutter speed or smaller aperture).

I've done sports where obviously things can be happening fast. Unless I move to a different location or turn a different way that could change the light coming into the camera, I wouldn't need to change settings besides focus. I would get set at a vantage point, meter the scene and get the camera set before anticipated action would come my way.  

If someone used a low ISO and a fast shutter speed that would allow less light into the camera, which might work if it's bright and sunny outdoors, but not so much if it's not that bright, that might not let enough light in for a proper exposure (or would mean needing to use a large aperture and maybe not have enough depth of field to get everything in focus.

Sharon
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5 years 1 month ago #458517 by goodoldroute15
It depends on the subject and the lighting of such. If I am trying to freeze motion on wildlife in less than great lighting situations, up goes the ISO. If I'm on a tripod with a stationary subject in "normal" lighting situations, down goes the ISO. "Depends" is about the best answer I have


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