Getting full frame image quality from a smartphones camera

3 years 3 months ago #552850 by Moossmann
My iPhone X just arrived this week and I'm a little surprised with the camera. Actually I'm loving this thing.  I've noticed a few bugs, however just focusing on the camera, it's pretty slick for something so small.  

However to get back on topic, I was just thinking about how much the cameras have advanced in the last 10 years in our phones we carry around. 

So the simple question here, is if you believe we'll get to full frame quality images in the next 5 years from a smart phone?  

The camera industry kind of reminds me of David and Goliath.  Apple and Samsung (Davids in the camera industry) have found a unconventional way to suck market share from every camera manufacture (Goliaths).  

I mean can you imagine a iPhone taking full frame RAW images?  How cool would that be?!

Now that would be a serious blow to the camera manufactures. 

Actually has Nikon or Canon ever considered jumping into the smartphone industry as a way to retain the point and shoot market?  Sony did.  


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3 years 3 months ago #552896 by effron
I'd expect maybe Canon to get into the phone market, not the much smaller Nikon....Also, I don't expect the phones to replace DSLRs anytime soon....

Why so serious?
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3 years 3 months ago #552936 by garyrhook

Moossmann wrote: So the simple question here, is if you believe we'll get to full frame quality images in the next 5 years from a smart phone?

I mean can you imagine a iPhone taking full frame RAW images?  How cool would that be?!


Um, no. Not gonna happen.

Most mobile phones can take a decent photo when there's plenty of light. That's not in dispute.

What they can't do is handle difficult situations. Like low light. Fast moving subjects. Closeups of birds in flight. You can only accomplish so much with a limited number of photons.

The sensor in a phone is tiny. You do understand that a full frame sensor is literally over an inch wide, right? You can't stick something that large into a device the size of a phone. And therefore you'll never get the same characteristics from a phone that you will from, e.g., a DSLR. I won't discuss the circle of confusion nor depth of field or all the math involved that makes your suggestion impossible.

Oh, and backgrounds blurred by software look like hell are laughable.

I'll stick to my real camera, thankyouverymuch.


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3 years 3 months ago #553131 by Tsoto
How large can you print a photo from an iPhone 6?  


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3 years 3 months ago #553328 by KenMan
I would guess, 24" wide by 16" tall before you start getting fuzzy. 


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3 years 2 months ago #553490 by Frisco
Yeah wouldn't that be nice.  Don't see this happening anytime soon.  

Nikon 18-55mm VR, Nikon 70-200mm VRII f/2.8, Nikon 50mm f/1.8, Nikon 10.5mm Fisheye, Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8, SB-700 & SB-800
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3 years 2 months ago #553630 by Joves

garyrhook wrote:

Moossmann wrote: So the simple question here, is if you believe we'll get to full frame quality images in the next 5 years from a smart phone?

I mean can you imagine a iPhone taking full frame RAW images?  How cool would that be?!


Um, no. Not gonna happen.

Most mobile phones can take a decent photo when there's plenty of light. That's not in dispute.

What they can't do is handle difficult situations. Like low light. Fast moving subjects. Closeups of birds in flight. You can only accomplish so much with a limited number of photons.

The sensor in a phone is tiny. You do understand that a full frame sensor is literally over an inch wide, right? You can't stick something that large into a device the size of a phone. And therefore you'll never get the same characteristics from a phone that you will from, e.g., a DSLR. I won't discuss the circle of confusion nor depth of field or all the math involved that makes your suggestion impossible.

Oh, and backgrounds blurred by software look like hell are laughable.

I'll stick to my real camera, thankyouverymuch.

:agree:
Yeah pretty much. Also yes the phones are getting better, and guess what so are the cameras themselves. The only part of the market this has pretty much affected is the P&S market, and the amateur I want a Dslr casual, but don't need one really user. This is where the majority of the losses have been for the big companies. No matter how good the iClowns say their cameras are, they will never equal a FF photo taken with good glass, and competent photographer.


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3 years 2 months ago #553658 by Ontherocks
All ships rise, in high tides  


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3 years 3 months ago #553822 by garyrhook

Joves wrote: The only part of the market this has pretty much affected is the P&S market, and the amateur I want a Dslr casual, but don't need one really user.


Sadly, I think P&S cameras are more flexible than phones, and produce better results in a wider range of conditions. But that doesn't really matter any longer.


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3 years 2 months ago #553927 by Kenya See
Yeah, not happening for some time


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