Getting windows exposed correctly with real estate photography

1 year 4 months ago #626245 by Victor.E
With my interior bracketing, I've been doing 5 photo bracket with 2 stops between each of my photos.  -4, -2, 0, +2, +4.  Actually I seem to recall another photographer using the same settings and he too had issues with getting the windows right.  

My windows just a tad too bright and almost feel 'Photoshopped'.  Not sure what else I can do here.  I have Photomatix and that has helped but these shots still aren't dialed in.  

How are you getting windows exposed correctly in situations like this?  


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1 year 4 months ago #626254 by garyrhook
I don't do interior architecture, but I have had occasion to deal with bright windows.

I found that I was happiest when I shoot the windows so that the exposure almost clipping, then pull down the whites and highlights in Lightroom just until I have some definition (I can see what was outside the window, be it clouds or whatever), then blend that into the shot.

IMO you don't want so much unexpected/unreal detail in the window to get attention, but the human eye knows what's out there, so you want to emulate that by providing just a bit of information to satisfy the mind's expectations.

Works for me. Hope this helps.


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1 year 4 months ago #626256 by Nikon Shooter
The simple strategy is to do two shoots: one for the interior
and the other for the window. Be sure to get everything right
in terms of focus and exposure and don't touch the focus as
you shoot for the windows.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
This person is a posting maniac and deserves a #1 badge!Top Poster
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1 year 4 months ago #626288 by Shadowfixer1
To actually do it correctly, you set the camera to expose for the scene outside the window and then use auxiliary lighting set to match the exposure on the camera. If you do it your way with bracketing, then the results will entirely depend on your editing skills.

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1 year 4 months ago #626298 by fmw
In the film days we did what shadowfixer recommends.  Now in the digital age it is more common to use HDR as Nikon Shooter recommends.  Either approach will get the job done.

I had to shoot lots of factory interiors back in the film days.  Those made home interiors seem like kids' stuff.  I generally had to rent additional lighting.  For a home, I would just use HDR.


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