Black and White Filters being used on DSLRs?

6 months 3 weeks ago #644582 by Phyllis Miller
I picked up a book on Ansel Adams and he speaks about using red, yellow and other filters for black and white photography.  Do people still use these today with DSLRs? 


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6 months 3 weeks ago #644592 by fmw
No, we control color contrast in black and white images in photo editing software instead.


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6 months 3 weeks ago #644621 by Nikon Shooter

fmw wrote: No, we control color contrast in black and white images in photo editing software instead.


Yes, I agree. Plus there are six colour channels in the 
colour tools panels you can use to reach any of your
ambitions.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
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6 months 3 weeks ago #644624 by Ozzie_Traveller
G'day Phyllis

Back in B&W film days, the photoographer was able to influence the tones within the image via the use of a coloured filter. Any filter used would lighten its own colour and darken the opposite colour - when considering colours on a colour wheel. Therefore a red filter would darken blue skies - thus providing wonderful landscape images

As NS says above - nowadays in post-processing you can 'with careful use' use the sliders and alter the colours / monochromatic tones to achieve much the same result

Hope this helps
Phil from the great land Downunder
www.flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/


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6 months 3 weeks ago #644637 by Nikon Shooter
One day, I hope I will be able to cook up sentences
like that in your language, Phil! :P

Light is free… capturing it is not!
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6 months 3 weeks ago #644695 by Ozzie_Traveller

Nikon Shooter wrote: One day, I hope I will be able to cook up sentences like that in your language, Phil! :P


Now come on mate ....  :)
you're better lookin' than me - and that gets you extra points

Phil


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6 months 3 weeks ago #644782 by Tony Imaging

Ozzie_Traveller wrote: G'day Phyllis

Back in B&W film days, the photoographer was able to influence the tones within the image via the use of a coloured filter. Any filter used would lighten its own colour and darken the opposite colour - when considering colours on a colour wheel. Therefore a red filter would darken blue skies - thus providing wonderful landscape images

As NS says above - nowadays in post-processing you can 'with careful use' use the sliders and alter the colours / monochromatic tones to achieve much the same result

Hope this helps
Phil from the great land Downunder
www.flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/



Agree, with many presets available that make the process much easier and quicker.  


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6 months 2 weeks ago #644883 by Ontherocks
When I do want B&W images, I just process my RAW color files in either Lightroom or I'll us Nik Software, there are some presets I like to use to convert to B&W.   I don't use any screw on your camera filters.  


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6 months 2 weeks ago #644915 by Nikon Shooter

Ontherocks wrote: … there are some presets… 


These are the enemies of good PP as they will interpret a file the
preset creator has never seen.

The only preset I allow my students to use are film specific grain
simulation; they only add a grain texture without affecting the to-
nal values of any given rendition.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
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6 months 2 weeks ago #644981 by Nikon Shooter

Tony Imaging wrote: … with many presets available that make the process much easier and quicker.  



I would like to prove the opposite… if there was a chance! :)

Light is free… capturing it is not!
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6 months 2 weeks ago #645151 by icepics
I've used red or yellow filters sometimes when I'm shooting B&W film. They block light rays that are on the red & yellow part of the color spectrum and enhance colors on the blue part of the spectrum. Easy enough to use (usually screw on, screw off), but the filters cut some light coming into the camera so adjustments may need to be made to get proper exposures.

I don't think they're typically used on digital cameras. When I'm shooting digitally I'll later use Remove Color in Photoshop (since B&W is the absence of color), maybe adjust contrast. Not too hard to do either.

I can't see adding supposed film looking 'grain' digitally since that actually consists of grains of silver in the emulsion on one side of the film. Usually photos shot on film may look more grainy from being used in lower light because of less light exposure. If you shoot film in adequate light and get proper exposures it's similar to shooting digitally that you'll probably be getting photos that are not very grainy or noisy. If you're in low light you may get more grain or digital noise. 

Sharon
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6 months 2 weeks ago #645180 by digitalpimp
When I want to convert to B&W, I just convert in post.  That way I'm not tied down to just B&W because of filters used on camera. 


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6 months 2 weeks ago #645202 by Jennifer_Fennell
I don't think so, people still use a black and white filter with DSLR.
Because in this era we have post-production options.


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6 months 2 weeks ago #645207 by Nikon Shooter

digitalpimp wrote: When I want to convert to B&W, I just convert in post.  That way I'm not tied down to just B&W because of filters used on camera. 


Correct.

Raw files have the all chrominance and the luminance values
that were captured at SR and may be properly processed in
PP. Using B&W filters prior to SR would only alter the quality
of the recorded data and render PP a nightmarish exercise.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
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