Camera gear and extreme heat

1 month 1 week ago #651673 by Alex
I finally made it out to Death Valley this weekend and no joke, it's HOT there.  122 F on Saturday.   Even 1:30am in the morning at Badwater Basin it was 106 F.

In these temps, I noticed camera gear get's very warm to touch fast.  My tripod legs were super warm too.  While I was driving back home yesterday, I started to think about  this.   Most electronics  have some sort of ventilation to keep some  airflow going through them, keeping electronics cooler.  But cameras don't,  I presume this has something to do with dusty dirty air floating around the camera sensor.   

Keeping this in mind, is there a point at which damage  could occur from heat?  I'm not talking about sticking your camera in an oven temps (which of course will melt a camera), although it sure felt like an oven, especially at Badwater Basis!

Hottest recorded temp was 134 F, which happens to have been recorded right there at Death Valley.  

So let's use that as a reference point if someone was out taking photos during temps around 134 F. Would that harm a camera?  


Zabriskie Point - 91 F  @ 5:50am
Make: Apple
Model: iPhone X
Lens: iPhone X back dual camera 4mm f/1.8
ISO: 32
Aperture: f/1.8
Shutter speed: 1/73 sec
Captured: Sun, 14 Jul 2019 5:42am


Devils Golf Course - 109 F @ 9:30am 

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1 month 1 week ago #651681 by Joe Peterson
Never been in weather anywhere near those temps!  

No clue, but will follow this thread as I'm interested now.   


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1 month 1 week ago #651697 by Dana Beasley
No idea, but what ball head is that?


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1 month 1 week ago #651699 by Shadowfixer1
It was 122 in the shade at the visitor's center when I was there. I have not had a problem with a camera and the heat but I did have a lens once that had the lubrication thin out and got on the aperture blades. This resulted in the aperture blades closing down in slow motion and throwing the exposure off.     

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1 month 1 week ago #651702 by ThatNikonGuy
HOT!  That's a good question question for the camera maker.  I hate to be an echo, but I haven't got even a guess on this one. 


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1 month 1 week ago #651703 by Ozzie_Traveller
G'day Alex

134F == 56C .... and we in Oz get temps like that every year in late summer somewhere across the outback.

As SF also mentioned, after extreme temps get to our gear the lubricants 'go gluggy'. This was well known with Compur shutter systems in years past, as well as aperture blades 'jamming'

As to your Q regarding heat stresses - I would surmise that 'no' an occasional heating will be accommodated via the camera body absorbing internal radiant temperatures, but a) over time with repeats, or b) trully excessive 'acute' heating where, say, the camera was left exposed to the sun while placed on the rear window parcel shelf in a closed up motor vehicle, might cause some damage of some sort

Phil from the great land Downunder
www.flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/


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1 month 1 week ago #651704 by garyrhook
That information is usually readily available as part of the specs for any camera. By way of example, the operating temperature range for the D850 is listed on the Nikon site as 32º - 104º F. Look here:

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/product/dslr-cameras/d850.html

Under Tech Specs / Miscellaneous.

It should be in the manual, too.


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1 month 1 week ago #651709 by Pete Franko

Dana Beasley wrote: No idea, but what ball head is that?


I'm pretty sure it's the Acretech GP.  He was talking about it in an article I read here last month.  


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1 month 1 week ago #651729 by Nikon Shooter
What a horrible thing, heat!
Extreme heat is not for me!  :ohmy:

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1 month 1 week ago #651770 by KENT MELTON

Nikon Shooter wrote: What a horrible thing, heat!
Extreme heat is not for me!  :ohmy:



I'm with you on this one.  No thank you.  I bet the pool water at hotels out there is so warm. 


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1 month 1 week ago #651934 by Inez Villarin

garyrhook wrote: That information is usually readily available as part of the specs for any camera. By way of example, the operating temperature range for the D850 is listed on the Nikon site as 32º - 104º F. Look here:

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/product/dslr-cameras/d850.html

Under Tech Specs / Miscellaneous.

It should be in the manual, too.



That doesn't make sense as "[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Temperature: 32 to 104°F (0 to 40°C)" as plenty of people shoot  in the arctic which is plenty colder than that  Then 104 F, heck I have shot my 5D in warmer weather than that. 
[/font]
Is that the internal operating temp then? 

If that is correct, what happens in  those temps then? 


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1 month 1 week ago #651957 by Nikon Shooter

Inez Villarin wrote: [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] [/font]Is that the internal operating temp then? If that is correct, what happens in  those temps then? 


The temperature inside the camera will take some time to reach
such high points. The concern is that some glue joints that may
soften too much. However, the chips will warmup during peak o-
perations but they are not under constant stress.

I worked in very hot areas and very cold too and not really expe-
rienced any difficulties except the normal short lived batteries in
the very cold.

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1 month 1 week ago #651993 by Neil Dulay
So with higher heat will the camera just shut down or will there be introduction to noise in the shot? 


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1 month 1 week ago - 1 month 1 week ago #652005 by Nikon Shooter
I don't know!

The worst shooting conditions I experienced were -37°C
in the Baffin Island (now in Nunavut) and 37°C+ in Nevada.
I had no problem (nor the gear!) in the cold but the gear
scored way better than me in the heat.

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1 month 1 week ago #652008 by garyrhook

Inez Villarin wrote: That doesn't make sense as "[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Temperature: 32 to 104°F (0 to 40°C)" as plenty of people shoot  in the arctic which is plenty colder than that  Then 104 F, heck I have shot my 5D in warmer weather than that. 
[/font]
Is that the internal operating temp then? 

If that is correct, what happens in  those temps then? 


I only reported what the manufacturer states on their website. I'm thinking that the stated range is for warranty, and they won't cover problem arising from use in extreme environments.

I would guess that prolonged exposure to extreme conditions could damage some of the materials in the camera, or impact its function. You'd have google for experiences, or ask the manufacturer.


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