Why are my photos so dark?

1 month 3 weeks ago #741513 by PlanesPhotos
 HI guys. I'm new to photography, never really learned too much, but most of my photos taken from a canon rebel xti 400d, with a cheap canon 55-250mm lens look like this: (I shoot in Tv mode)



these are just some examples.


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1 month 3 weeks ago #741514 by Razky
They're a bit underexposed.


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1 month 3 weeks ago #741515 by PlanesPhotos
Any way to fix em on the camera?


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1 month 3 weeks ago #741516 by nokk
if you're shooting p, av or tv then increase the exposure compensation dial to brighten your photos.  decrease it to darken the photos.  


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1 month 3 weeks ago #741517 by TCav
There may be several reasons why your images are a bit dark, but the one I consider to be most likely is the Metering Mode you're using. See gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/7/0900000357/01/EOS...00DIM-EN.pdf#page=73


The following user(s) said Thank You: PlanesPhotos

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1 month 3 weeks ago #741518 by PlanesPhotos

TCav wrote: There may be several reasons why your images are a bit dark, but the one I consider to be most likely is the Metering Mode you're using. See gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/7/0900000357/01/EOS...00DIM-EN.pdf#page=73


I've found out I should be shooting with centered metering mode. There is also a dial on my screen and it says I should move it up for more exposure. I could fix this in editing but I'd rather shoot nicely


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1 month 3 weeks ago #741547 by Shadowfixer1
Center mode in metering is fine. Shouldn't be a problem. You have a combination of things going on. If you are using a "set" ISO, then the shutter speed is too fast for that ISO and aperture. The camera sets the aperture in TV mode but it can only set it to the maximum opening for the lens you have on the camera which is most likely a "slow" lens. It can't open further to allow more light. Two things you can do are 1. raise you're ISO manually until the exposure meter in the camera says the exposure is good or the easiest thing 2. set the ISO to "Auto". There are other ways also but you have to get the meter inside the camera to be at "0". As a beginner, worry about "exposure compensation" when you have more experience. 
I will also add, you can set a slower shutter to brighten the image, but you have to keep in mind subject movement and also your camera shake when deciding on the speed. It's a balancing act.

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1 month 3 weeks ago #741548 by nokk

PlanesPhotos wrote:

TCav wrote: There may be several reasons why your images are a bit dark, but the one I consider to be most likely is the Metering Mode you're using. See gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/7/0900000357/01/EOS...00DIM-EN.pdf#page=73


I've found out I should be shooting with centered metering mode. There is also a dial on my screen and it says I should move it up for more exposure. I could fix this in editing but I'd rather shoot nicely


if you increase the exposure compensation, this will move the exposure meter to the right and brighten your photo.  i think it's a button press and turn the dial on canon's entry models, but i'm not sure since i haven't used that camera.  it's better to get the exposure correct in camera than to try to fix it later.


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1 month 3 weeks ago #741549 by lightcapture
If you're shooting a subject into a bright background, like the sky in your examples, you need to compensate by setting you camera to about .7-1.3 stop over-exposure to compensate.
If you have a basic editing program you can elevate the exposure and contrast to get a nice photo our of these photos.


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1 month 3 weeks ago - 1 month 3 weeks ago #741558 by Shadowfixer1
Get your exposure meter to zero before you begin worrying about exposure compensation. Get the basics down first. You said the dial in your camera said it needed more exposure. You have to give it more exposure somehow before you begin fine tuning the image. Cameras are pretty smart. If all else fails, go to Program mode. You can then make adjustments from there which would be called "Program Shift". You can change aperture or shutter speed with the dials and the camera will adjust the other value to get you an exposure. If that exposure is not exactly what you want, then use exposure compensation to fine tune the image, but get the meter to zero before you do.

Your first image is 1 stop to 1.25 stops underexposed. The second image is only about a 1/2 stop under exposed. You're close but not quite there. Good luck.

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