Is shooting in RAW really needed?

9 years 7 months ago #82167 by Slick Man
I'm no pro and it always takes up so much space, then I can only download the photos to my one computer that has the software to read the RAW files. I know you get more edit control with the RAW files, but if I don't do any professional photography and it's just me, will high resolution JPG be good?

I'd rather be shooting!

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9 years 7 months ago - 9 years 7 months ago #82173 by Henry Peach
As long as you are getting what you want from the in-camera processing shooting with the camera set to jpeg is fine.

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9 years 7 months ago #82185 by crystal
No raw is not really needed. So many people say shoot raw because it's the best, it's the digital negative, but in reality it's not really needed. Lets put it this way, if you are fine shooting jpeg and you have no need for raw, then don't shoot raw. Continue to have fun shooting on jpeg.

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9 years 7 months ago #82189 by MLKstudios
There are pros who use JPEG. If I may recommend you get the white balance set perfectly though. That's something easily corrected in RAW, but is part of the image in JPEG.

www.photographytalk.com/photography-arti...tipusing-a-gray-card

HTH,

Matthew :)

Matthew L Kees
MLK Studios Photography School
www.MLKstudios.com
[email protected]
"Every artist, was once an amateur"

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9 years 7 months ago #82191 by Johnnie
There has been much of talk concerning JPEG vs RAW Captures. I know many professionals who shoot JPEG only. I myself shoot both all depends on the subject matter etc. You can have some control over the photo's shot in JPEG when processing - just open as a RAW File and go from there.


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9 years 7 months ago #82449 by Slick Man
OK, this makes sense to me. You guys are great! Thanks for the help here.

I'd rather be shooting!

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9 years 7 months ago #82499 by Nikonjan
I have shot jpeg and raw together and everytime have thrown out the jpegs. I guess I like my raw control better.

www.betterphoto.com?nikonjan

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9 years 7 months ago - 9 years 7 months ago #82531 by TheNissanMan

Nikonjan wrote: I have shot jpeg and raw together and everytime have thrown out the jpegs. I guess I like my raw control better.


As an amatuer who is still learning I would not be without the extra safeguards that RAW allow. When you don't get the shot just right RAw allows you to save what would otherwise be a shot destinned for the bin...

Do you haev to shoot RAW, no, will it increase your keeper rate, most definately.


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9 years 7 months ago #82595 by effron
This question has been debated to death. RAW is best, for me. YMMV........:)

Why so serious?
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9 years 7 months ago #82601 by ilh2009ky
In addition to agreeing with the comments posted above, I would emphasize that the choice depends on what you photograph and how you feel about control. Here's a brief example: I have a friend who shoots JPEG in night clubs on the weekends and prints out the photos and sells them on the spot. He clears $1000 each weekend night. I, on the other hand, shoot nature, travel and landscape photos in RAW and I love the image control provided by RAW. I am making very little money on my shots. I'm happy; but, poor. My friend has to deal with cigarette smoke and rowdy crowds; but, he's making a good living from photography.

If you can't decide, shoot JPEG + RAW. This way get your JPEGs right away; and, when you have time, you can process selected RAW images and see if you prefer them over the JPEG ones. Cost of spare or extra memory for storage (external hard drives) is really cheap these days.

Ian Leslie Harry
www.ilhphotography.com

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9 years 7 months ago #82677 by Moe
Personally I like the piece of mind knowing that I could always go back to the image and have the RAW file, but to answer your question no you don't.


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9 years 7 months ago #82861 by Stealthy Ninja
Only if you're good. ;) :p

Seriously if you're still learning and/or don't have the programs to use it, then there's no point.

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9 years 7 months ago #82917 by Baydream

Stealthy Ninja wrote: Only if you're good. ;) :p

Seriously if you're still learning and/or don't have the programs to use it, then there's no point.

I beg to disagree. Shooting both RAW+jpeg gives even relative newcomers a comparison to begin practicing their editing skills with RAW. Since Picasa can handle RAW from almost every manufacturer, everyone can have the tools to begin learning.

Shoot, learn and share. It will make you a better photographer.
fineartamerica.com/profiles/john-g-schickler.html?tab=artwork

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9 years 7 months ago #87293 by Slick Man

Baydream wrote:

Stealthy Ninja wrote: Only if you're good. ;) :p

Seriously if you're still learning and/or don't have the programs to use it, then there's no point.

I beg to disagree. Shooting both RAW+jpeg gives even relative newcomers a comparison to begin practicing their editing skills with RAW. Since Picasa can handle RAW from almost every manufacturer, everyone can have the tools to begin learning.


But doesn't that take up double the space on camera then on computer?

I'd rather be shooting!

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9 years 7 months ago #87995 by Stealthy Ninja

Baydream wrote:

Stealthy Ninja wrote: Only if you're good. ;) :p

Seriously if you're still learning and/or don't have the programs to use it, then there's no point.

I beg to disagree. Shooting both RAW+jpeg gives even relative newcomers a comparison to begin practicing their editing skills with RAW. Since Picasa can handle RAW from almost every manufacturer, everyone can have the tools to begin learning.


It also gives them a lot of files. I never understood the mentality of shooting jpeg+RAW in the age of lightroom and such.

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