How is this type of photo taken?

7 years 3 months ago #386169 by JeremyS
I'm very interested in night photography, with a lit subject in the foreground, and a night sky lit up with stars/milky way/ star trails.

Very similar to this photo which is a finalist in a recent contest on viewbug.

www.viewbug.com/contests/lifes-largest-m...hoto-contest/4787227

I am very interested in being able to do material such as this but I'm unsure how exactly they are taken. Are they typically light painted, or are they two exposures which have been made into a composite, if everyone could shed light onto this for me, it would be awesome! Thanks.


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago - 7 years 3 months ago #386233 by Stealthy Ninja
Very long exposure and minimal light on the building. Often the building doesn't need any light for stuff like this.

Once, in Malaysia, I took a shot on a boat in almost pitch darkness (at a very high iso) all the colours popped out again! I was shocked at how little light is needed to light something given enough iso or enough time.  The light is probably from the moon in that shot you linked.  It wouldn't even need to be a full moon (in fact the full moon would probably make it too bright with such a long exposure. White balance would give it the warm glow.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #386396 by JeremyS

Stealthy Ninja wrote: Very long exposure and minimal light on the building. Often the building doesn't need any light for stuff like this.

Once, in Malaysia, I took a shot on a boat in almost pitch darkness (at a very high iso) all the colours popped out again! I was shocked at how little light is needed to light something given enough iso or enough time.  The light is probably from the moon in that shot you linked.  It wouldn't even need to be a full moon (in fact the full moon would probably make it too bright with such a long exposure. White balance would give it the warm glow.


Well, simple solution to what I thought was a complex situation! Thanks Stealthy. I'm going to give it a shot in a couple weeks with a very old farmhouse in the area, it might make for a cool photo!


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #386699 by IzzieK
I would be interested in what you can come up with...


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #386758 by JD Imagery
This might help




Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #386769 by JeremyS

JD Imagery wrote: This might help



I understand that stuff, however he doesn't explain how he adds in the foreground, thats a problem I'm trying to conquer right now. Does anyone know how this is done in PS?


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #386770 by KCook
Thanks JD, that Steve Perry site is pretty nice!

Kelly

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #386836 by garyrhook
He looks like a park ranger. :silly:

He doesn't discuss why 30 second exposures are important.

+1 on the Photographer's Ephemeris. I was just using it last night; t's moving to a browser-based tool, FYI. Good advice on the locking remote release. Extra credit for using a lavalier microphone.

You will hear him mention the foreground shots at the 4:34 mark. He takes separate shots at dusk, while there's still some light. You then align that with your finished composite and mask it in.

If you are unfamiliar with it, google for "photoshop layer alignment" to learn how, even though he uses StarStax for it this work. If you are unfamiliar with masking, it's time to learn.

I see he was in Nevada for these captures.


Photo Comments
The following user(s) said Thank You: IzzieK

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #386837 by JeremyS

garyrhook wrote: He looks like a park ranger. :silly:

He doesn't discuss why 30 second exposures are important.

+1 on the Photographer's Ephemeris. I was just using it last night; t's moving to a browser-based tool, FYI. Good advice on the locking remote release. Extra credit for using a lavalier microphone.

You will hear him mention the foreground shots at the 4:34 mark. He takes separate shots at dusk, while there's still some light. You then align that with your finished composite and mask it in.

If you are unfamiliar with it, google for "photoshop layer alignment" to learn how, even though he uses StarStax for it this work. If you are unfamiliar with masking, it's time to learn.

I see he was in Nevada for these captures.


Will photoshop layer alignment work to put the foreground in detail or does that have to be done manually, if it has to be done automatically what works best, if it is manually, what works best? We're getting to the root of my problem :D


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #386853 by garyrhook

Takennnn wrote: Will photoshop layer alignment work to put the foreground in detail or does that have to be done manually, if it has to be done automatically what works best, if it is manually, what works best? We're getting to the root of my problem :D


I see we are discussing a new skill. All righty then.

(Using the video for an example) he locked his camera down and did not move it. This implies a good tripod, with weights, a good stiff head (:blink: ) to hold the camera steady and immovable, and getting there early to set up, while there's still light.

His foreground shots will then be framed in precisely the same way as his sky shots. Nothing to do there. However, PS can help overcome any problems you  might have if you don't have shots perfectly coaligned at shutter release time.

That said....

Alignment will not bring in the foreground interest to composite it with the background. To do that you must use a layer mask, which essentially a gray-scale mapping that applies to your layer: areas that have brightness in the mask are seen, areas that are darker in the mask are not seen. Many masks are simply black and white.

You put your foreground layer above your background layer, select that layer in the layers panel, then add mask to it by clicking on the little gray rectangle with the white dot at the bottom of the layers panel. Or add a "pixel mask" in the Masks panel. If you click directly on the mask icon in that layer, you can now paint onto the mask. Use a brush to do this. (You can toggle visibility of your mask by alt-clicking on the mask icon.)

Paint over where your foreground is, and it should be revealed. from the masked layer.

Load 2 images into PS, combine as layers in a single document, and experiment to learn more.

Hope this helps.


Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #387339 by Mick.at.CameraBits
My own preference is to "auto-align" layers and then choose the "lighter color" blending mode between any number of layers.  This will pick the brightest pixel for any spot on the image.   Then I can paint darkness back in with a layer mask if I need to.   (this is how I can shoot a car with a single flash in multiple spots and make it seem like I have 7 lights on it :-) 


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #387373 by JeremyS

Mick.at.CameraBits wrote: My own preference is to "auto-align" layers and then choose the "lighter color" blending mode between any number of layers.  This will pick the brightest pixel for any spot on the image.   Then I can paint darkness back in with a layer mask if I need to.   (this is how I can shoot a car with a single flash in multiple spots and make it seem like I have 7 lights on it :-) 


Awesome, that is another method to try, when you mention the "Lighter color" blending mode, you mean in PS the Lighten blending mode? Or is it something else. Thanks a lot!


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #387394 by garyrhook

Takennnn wrote:

Mick.at.CameraBits wrote: My own preference is to "auto-align" layers and then choose the "lighter color" blending mode between any number of layers.  This will pick the brightest pixel for any spot on the image.   Then I can paint darkness back in with a layer mask if I need to.   (this is how I can shoot a car with a single flash in multiple spots and make it seem like I have 7 lights on it :-) 


Awesome, that is another method to try, when you mention the "Lighter color" blending mode, you mean in PS the Lighten blending mode? Or is it something else. Thanks a lot!


He does not.  Select 2 or more layers simultaneously, choose "Edit /  Auto-Blend Layers..." and see what your options are on the dialog. CS5 doesn't have a mode selection for some reason, but I think CS3 did. I know I've combined images to auto-remove things that move...


Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
7 years 3 months ago #387406 by KCook
Oooh, that sounds nice!  Elements9 does have layers, but does not have any AutoBlend tool for the layers.

Kelly

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,

817.3K

241K

  • Facebook

    817,251 / Likes

  • Twitter

    241,000 / Followers

  • Google+

    1,620,816 / Followers

Latest Reviews

The FujiFilm X-E4 is a newer camera, having been released earlier this year. But it's also an affordable camera - particularly if you buy it used.

Oct 05, 2021

Are used cameras worth it? Though there are some risks, there are many more benefits of buying used cameras. Learn why you should shop used in this guide!

Sep 20, 2021

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 II is now six years old, but despite that, it still has many capabilities and features that make it a good option for today's beginner and enthusiast photographers.

Sep 17, 2021

The Nikon Z50 is a high-quality and affordable camera. Learn about the Nikon Z50 pros, cons, specs, and pricing in this quick guide.

Sep 16, 2021
Get 600+ Pro photo lessons for $1

Forum Top Posters

Latest Articles

Use these tips to learn a few basics for editing real estate photos that entice buyers to purchase properties.

Oct 14, 2021

What makes a good camera strap? What should you look for in a camera strap? Surprisingly, it's a more complex process than you might think!

Oct 14, 2021

Want to take better portraits? In this guide, learn a few tricks of the trade that will help you instantly improve the quality of the portraits you create.

Oct 13, 2021

There are many options when it comes to the best Olympus lenses for landscape photography, but in this guide, we narrow it down to three top choices.

Oct 12, 2021

In this portrait photography tutorial, you'll learn a few tricks on how to plan a portrait photoshoot that gets you the best results (and the happiest clients!).

Oct 11, 2021

The GoPro 10 is an ideal action camera for taking high-octane videos, but it's also great for photography. Learn a few tips for taking photos with a GoPro in this tutorial.

Oct 08, 2021

If you shoot video, you need an Atomos Ninja V. It offers much in the way of expanded capabilities and tools for improving the quality of your videos.

Oct 08, 2021

Use these fall photography tips for real estate to capitalize on the beautiful fall colors to make your listing photos really stand out.

Oct 08, 2021