shooting jpeg or raw

10 years 11 months ago #1784 by aprileye
I have been using DSLRs for a couple of years now, and am wondering what are the differences between shooting jpg and shooting raw? I do know that raw files take up more hard disk space.


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10 years 11 months ago #1854 by imit8er
Some photographers have a preference and a reason for it but I would say shoot in jpeg so you can fit more pictures on your memory card.


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10 years 9 months ago #8241 by wagaboo
If you want a no nonsense approach, then use JPG BUT if you want total control over your photos in post processing then RAW is what you want . When I'm doing wildlife, scenery etc where the color contrasts are high then I use JPG


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10 years 9 months ago #8275 by Nod
wagaboo has it right, you can do a lot more in post-processing with a raw file.


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10 years 9 months ago #8287 by Screamin Scott
Think of a "raw" file as a negative....It has all of the pertinent data stored on it from when the shutter was snapped. Then a Jpg is like a print that you get from a photofinisher. What, you say the color wasn't right on the print? Neither was the sharpness?....Raw files are a lossless format whereas Jpegs are lossy. What that means in layman terms is that with a jpeg file, whenever you open it up, make an adjustment & save your work, the file is compressed & in the compression, loses some of the data. Do repeated adjustments over time & it can really affect the printed image. When you post process a raw file, the information being changed is kept in a seperate little "sidecar" file & the original data is kept intact....Practically speaking, raw files are more forgiving of errors you make as a photographer. They allow you more control over the finished product. Jpeg files are produced by the camera makers software algorithm (which you have some control over in the menu system on your camera)

Scott Ditzel Photography

www.flickr.com/photos/screaminscott/

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10 years 9 months ago #8290 by Yasko
RAW just has better quality all around. Less noise, richer colors, more room for editing. Use it if you have the patience and software for editing, and you don't mind filling up a card more.


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10 years 9 months ago #8309 by blindsquirrel
I am a relative newcomer, new to photography just about 1 yr now. I shoot a Canon EOS XSi using both Canon and Tamron lenses, and I shoot Raw almost exclusively. I also do a fair amount of HDR using Photomatix Pro. I like the post processing features and recently saved a shoot for a band when I forgot to switch the camera white balance to flash. I didn't realize my mistake until they came up in Canons Photo Pro program, where it was an easy correction. Yes, they are large files and I keep the raw images, converting to jpeg only when needed. The only time I'll take a corrected raw image into Photoshop is for some clean up features that are superior to what's available in the Canon program. I like to think of raw as film, it lets me tune my camera with out the original shot being pre-processed. When I see a pattern of corrections being made to the raw file, I go back to the camera and make adjustments. Outside of saving space on the card, I don't see any advantage to shooting jpeg vs. raw. I do think its subjective, and it just depends on your own comfort level. Don't be afraid to try something new, after all, amateurs built the Ark, professionals built the Titanic!


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