landscape photography

2 years 5 months ago #547126 by Aritra86
Im using nikon D7000 camera. Whenever I try to take landscape photo with my nikon 18-105 lens the image I get is not sharp, colour quality is not so rich or bright. How can i over come it? What should be an ideal camera setting for daytime landscape and for capturing night sky with foreground?


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2 years 5 months ago #547137 by Bryston3bsst
There really is no ideal setting for landscape per se. Every situation calls for different settings depending on available light, the landscape itself, colors.....

You are not happy with your results, how about posting some examples along with what kind of equipment you're using.. Might make it easier to make suggestions.


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2 years 5 months ago #547138 by Aritra86
how can i add my photo here, to show you?


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2 years 5 months ago #547139 by Aritra86
u can visit my profile, there is only one photo there. this is that type of photo


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2 years 5 months ago - 2 years 5 months ago #547154 by garyrhook

Aritra86 wrote: how can i add my photo here, to show you?


When you are editing a post here in the forum, there should be an "Attachment" button below the text editor. It may be that you must have posted a few times first (i.e. participate) before adding images... I don't recall if there are any restrictions. In any event, we'll go have a look at your photo.

.... or not. I don't see anything that shows my your photos on your profile.  Add a couple more comments here or on other threads, and see if you can get to the point of adding attachments.

That said, I'll say this: All of those beautiful landscape photos you see on IG, etc? Those are heavily processed in post. They don't come out of the camera that way, not RAW, and certainly not JPG. If you want to do landscape photography you're going to need to learn how to edit.


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2 years 5 months ago #547155 by Aritra86
here is my photo. 


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2 years 5 months ago #547161 by garyrhook
I would suggest starting by resetting your expectations. If you have not reached the point where you can assess the light in this scene, you might best start at the beginning. And that would be exposure. 

The light in this scene is not ideal. Landscape photography is usually done in the golden or blue  hours, not midday. You'll want to research light, how to compose, when to take photos, things like that. Learn how to process. Great photography is an art and takes work, study, and patience. As you have just discovered, if it were easy, anyone could point a camera and create amazing photographs. Turns out that's not the case.


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2 years 5 months ago #547267 by Joves
:agree:
Yeah pretty much what he said. You are dealing with a lot of haze as well. You can also experiment with a Circular Polarizer to try, and tone that down. You just set it and get it to a more pleasing effect. Also you need to learn to shoot RAW along with your Jpegs for your post processing work to gain more latitude in fixing problems. The problem with using any dark filter though is that your shadows will be even darker. But you can make the sky look less washed. Also I did not try, and read the settings in the images. If you are shooting with the lens wide open that is not good for landscapes, and that lens does not get sharp until the f/7.1+ range up to a certain point. So experiment with it, and learn what works best.


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1 year 11 months ago #578503 by fmw
Unsharp images result from inaccurate focus or motion blur. Focus in your image is all infinity so any sharpness problem would be motion blur. That means you either need to use a higher shutter speed or a tripod.

One of the advantages of a tripod is that you could have used one to employ HDR techniques to bring the exposure of the distant mountains and the nearby valley closer together. You can do this to a degree with your photo editing software.

The haze you see on the mountains is a matter of distance. Work with your editing software to reduce the haze and touch up the contrast. You can increase the color saturation there as well if like.

Exposing a nigh sky with foreground would depend on the darkness of the night sky and the foreground subject. Use a tripod and experiment with different exposure settings.

You have a capable camera. It is just a matter of getting the best out of it. That means practice by making images.


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1 year 10 months ago #582490 by Jared-Weaver
Harsh midday light is not going to produce rich color no matter how you shoot. Shoot during golden and blue hour. That's where the real magic happens.

A polarizing filter will help clear up the haze.

Lenses with focal lengths that range from wide to telephoto sacrifice sharpness. Once you figure out what kind of landscapes you like to shoot, invest in some pro quality glass.


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1 year 8 months ago #593990 by donnnnnny
you couldpurchase some neutral density soft grad filters, 03,06.09 are the usual numbers. I have lee ones but there are other types on the market.the 09 would in this case give you alot more detail in the sky.As for focus, i very rarly use autofocus in my landscape shots, for this shot id use F11 and Infinity, .make sure your lens is set on the infinity sign which is like a figure 8 set lens exactly on the sign or symbol, dont go past it on the focus ring.This shopud give you acceptable focus from approx 1.7 meters in front of the lens to infinity way over by the mountains,You dont have any forground which is close so no need to focus stack here. hope this helps


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1 year 6 months ago - 1 year 6 months ago #603133 by selena18
I would like to recommend you to use sunny 16 rule. It is a technique of calculating the correct daylight exposure. Set your aperture to f/16 in full sun, around 100 ISO and shutter speed at about 1/100 or 1/125. Always try to shoot just after sunrise and before sunset which is called golden hour.

While night sky photography, if you want to add interesting features to a dazzling shot of the night sky (with or without stars, constellations, or the moon), start with the following settings:
1. An aperture of f/5.6,
2. A shutter speed of 15-25 seconds for a well-lit scene, or 3-4 minutes for a very dark landscape,
3. and an ISO between 100 and 400 (always strive to stay as close to 100 as you can).


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9 months 2 weeks ago #649338 by mariablassingame
Thanks for sharing your info and landscape image. You can use clipping path service for beauty enhancement of images. I truly appreciate your efforts and I will be waiting for your next post thank you once again.


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