How to take dramatic storm clouds

1 year 5 months ago #643892 by elektrobank
Anyone know how to take this style photo? 



(Credit Sean R. Heavey) 


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1 year 5 months ago #643923 by Shadowfixer1
Simple. Go to where these clouds exist. 

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1 year 5 months ago #643925 by Nikon Shooter
Location, location, location!

Light is free… capturing it is not!
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1 year 5 months ago #643944 by mariablassingame
Use Long Shutter Speeds. Once photographing the night sky with extended exposure, exposures of quarter-hour or longer can show the rotation of the planet. You will need an optical lens and a durable rack, of course. You'll be wanting to use a cable unharness to eliminate camera shake of any kind because it can RUIN your picture.


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1 year 5 months ago #643983 by elektrobank

Shadowfixer1 wrote: Simple. Go to where these clouds exist. 


This isn't naturally occurring, I wanted to know the technique the photographer used to get that circular shape. 


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1 year 5 months ago - 1 year 5 months ago #643985 by Nikon Shooter

elektrobank wrote: How[/size] to take dramatic storm clouds

[/size]
So, you ask "how to take…?" but you really want to know
"how to MAKE…?"

I may be wrong but this cloud formation does not
suggest anything was manipulated.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
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1 year 5 months ago #643986 by elektrobank

Nikon Shooter wrote:

elektrobank wrote: How[/size] to take dramatic storm clouds

[/size]
So, you ask "how to take…?" but you really want to know
"how to MAKE…?"

I may be wrong but this cloud formation does not
suggest anything was manipulated.


Are these clouds naturally occurring? I can't tell. I've never seen clouds like that so I assumed it was a technique they used to make them look circular. 


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1 year 5 months ago #643989 by Nikon Shooter
I admit that this cloud formation was enhanced in
pp in terms of saturation and possibly contrast but
I can not swear of manipulation.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
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1 year 5 months ago #643990 by Shadowfixer1

elektrobank wrote:

Shadowfixer1 wrote: Simple. Go to where these clouds exist. 


This isn't naturally occurring, I wanted to know the technique the photographer used to get that circular shape. 

Well, yes it is naturally occurring. It's not a technique to get that cloud shape. It was edited for color, contrast, etc. Go take a look at Storm Chaser photos and you will see all types of crazy cloud formations. So, my answer still is, if you want to take images like this, go to where they are. Oklahoma is probably the best chance for this type of cloud.

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1 year 5 months ago - 1 year 5 months ago #643992 by Troponin
This is the naturally occurring rotation of warm and cold air which has created a funnel cloud. In a few seconds, that will be a full tornado. What gives it the amazing look is that the sun is setting in the background, illuminating the clouds. Add contrast etc and it really pops. 

Oh, and that one is HUGE 


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1 year 5 months ago #644057 by garyrhook

elektrobank wrote: This isn't naturally occurring, I wanted to know the technique the photographer used to get that circular shape. 


That would be incorrect. There are number of cloud formations that are quite rare, but real nonetheless.

"I haven't seen it so therefore it must not be real" should never be the foundation for an assessment.


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1 year 5 months ago #644073 by elektrobank

garyrhook wrote:

elektrobank wrote: This isn't naturally occurring, I wanted to know the technique the photographer used to get that circular shape. 


That would be incorrect. There are number of cloud formations that are quite rare, but real nonetheless.

"I haven't seen it so therefore it must not be real" should never be the foundation for an assessment.


You are correct Gary. The reason I jumped to this conclusion is that I've seen pics from other photographers that look just like this pic and were literally taken right outside my window. Some were even taken on the same days I was watching the storm to see if I could get a similar photo. Yet I've never seen any clouds that look even remotely like this. Is it possible they are taking a long exposure shot that is perpendicular to the direction the clouds are moving? Or is this just naturally how the clouds look if you capture them from the right angle? And if so, where would I want to shoot from?

Thanks! 


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1 year 5 months ago #644091 by garyrhook

elektrobank wrote:

garyrhook wrote:

elektrobank wrote: This isn't naturally occurring, I wanted to know the technique the photographer used to get that circular shape. 


That would be incorrect. There are number of cloud formations that are quite rare, but real nonetheless.

"I haven't seen it so therefore it must not be real" should never be the foundation for an assessment.


You are correct Gary. The reason I jumped to this conclusion is that I've seen pics from other photographers that look just like this pic and were literally taken right outside my window. Some were even taken on the same days I was watching the storm to see if I could get a similar photo. Yet I've never seen any clouds that look even remotely like this. Is it possible they are taking a long exposure shot that is perpendicular to the direction the clouds are moving? Or is this just naturally how the clouds look if you capture them from the right angle? And if so, where would I want to shoot from?
 


As stated above, there are storm systems that look like this. They're just rare. They may only show up in certain areas of the world, too. Yes, I think some folks create images, but not everyone. And I don't know where that was taken, but the midwest plains in the US can produce some amazing atmospheric displays.

You might also look up lenticular clouds. They're quite interesting, too.


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1 year 4 weeks ago #660374 by Joao Rodrigues
You need to wait for the heavy clouds, so rain mostly, take the photography in the correct exposure and work the blues in the editing program you use. I don't use editing programs, but I believe that's how people normally do it.  


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