Why new photographers should go mirrorless...

2 years 4 months ago #572893 by Ted-Purchase
Hey guy's I made this video for new photographers looking for the best camera. Hope you like it!



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2 years 4 months ago #573018 by KCook
Audio no worky. Which is just as well. Your title already sounds like a sales job.

Kelly

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

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2 years 4 months ago #573106 by Ted-Purchase
Audio works just fine on multiple devices that I own. And if I'm a salesman then I am the worst salesman of all time because this video isn't monotized, nor do I have any sponsorship or affiliates, So I am literally pulling in 0 dollars and 0 cents off of this.

Sorry the audio is messed up on your device, but please actually watch the video on a working device before you judge it.


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2 years 4 months ago #573189 by KCook
You're right about my audio, it was fubar. My blog isn't monetized either, though I sure wish it were. Tried, but just could not make it all the way to the end of your video. The same old exaggerations I've heard from so many others. I do like mirrorless myself, highly unlikely I will ever buy another DSLR. But I don't believe in pounding that into newbies.

Kelly

Canon 50D, Olympus PL2
kellycook.zenfolio.com/

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2 years 4 months ago #573660 by garyrhook
Yeah, the audio is fine.

The logic, on the other hand, is not.

It's never a good idea to make an equipment decision based on features. Ever. One should start with what one wishes to accomplish, then research options based on a prioritized list of goals. This video wants to expound on features that may or may not be relevant to any photographer, newbie or otherwise.

Why is in-body IS better? It's not. Stabilization is good, but honestly, folks should learn to shoot without it first, to learn good technique. IS/VR then becomes a tool to allow for more opportunity, which is what it should do.

Weight: whatever. I tell folks to go to a store and hold the camera. Use it. Play with it. The camera you want is the camera you don't want to put down. Mirrorless has little to do with that.

You criticize focus, then mention great AF in Nikon and Canon. What? Did I misunderstand?

Future proof? Perhaps. Probably But that doesn't mean that an SLR body is going to go away any time soon. So the longevity of mirrorless systems has (almost) nothing to do with the future of SLR systems.

Peaking indication for highlights and shadows: that's a good thing. I use focus peaking on my Pany G7, too. But the fact of the matter is that the in-camera light meter (in a DSLR) is only going to have significant issues in high contrast situations. Which makes is it an issue to learn about and deal with. A mirrorless might tell you about the shadows and highlights, but that won't help when your shot requires a larger dynamic range that you just don't have. Again, mirrorless has little to do with that. And it's certainly not an excuse to not learn how to use your camera.

Microfocus adjustments: listening to this one might conclude that this is a significant, pervasive problem. It's not. Yeah, having to make adjustments is a problem, but less of a problem with smaller apertures. Then you discuss the speed at which a camera can lock AF, and that's just conflation. The two have nothing to do with one another.

IMO your approach to these issues is bass-ackwards. Do each of these warrant consideration? Absolutely, yes. Are they compelling reasons for a newbie to choose that type of camera? Only if all they want is a glorified point-and-shoot. Which some do; no argument there. Others want to learn photography, and a lot of those features.... should be ignored.

Disclaimer: I own a Nikon DSLR and a Pany G7. Neither of those impact my choice of when I go out and shoot. I could easily keep the Pany with me at all times; I don't.

I'd like to suggest that you might be serving folks better by discussing these issues as "Factors That Might Impact Your Camera System Purchase Decision." Then presenting them as such.

IMNSHO, of course.

On the video, you should have redone some of those shots. Some of the cuts are jarring.


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2 years 3 months ago #577759 by Tobias-Nielsen
Hey man thanks for the vid. Very useful for someone like me in a purchasing stage atm. I’m a beginner and been looking at the Sony A6000. Would you say that I would get enough out of it as opposed to my iPhone X?


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2 years 3 months ago #578511 by fmw
I view things more simplistically.  After decades of professional photography, I am now an old amateur.  I moved to mirrorless because mirrorless cameras are smaller and lighter.  There is less for this old body to haul around.  For beginners I think the camera chosen is trivial.  Beginners need to learn how to make good images, not obsess about equipment.  I used to run around with large cases full of photo gear to handle a shoot.  I can't imagine taking more than a mirrorless and 2 or 3 lenses for a weekend outing.  If a larger and more flexible system is needed, the SLR is the answer.  If small and light is the key, then mirrorless is better.

Either way, the systems can make great or awful images depending on the skill and creativeness of the operator.  So the choice really has little to do with resulting photographs.  It has to do with the photographic requirements.


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