Inconsistencies with cameras during security checks at airport

4 months 1 day ago #757889 by Fitch
I love what the TSA does for our safety, however I have one burning question regarding our cameras:  Some airports I have been too make me take my camera our and have on its own tray, while others tell me to keep it in the bag.  At least with my laptop, all want that taken out and placed in its own tray when going through security.  I had one person get snappy with me yesterday in DFW as I was heading home because I didn't take my camera out.  And that was because two security points earlier this trip I was told "cameras don't need to be taken out".  

So which is it?  


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4 months 1 day ago #757896 by Razky

Fitch wrote: I love what the TSA does for our safety, however I have one burning question regarding our cameras:  Some airports I have been too make me take my camera our and have on its own tray, while others tell me to keep it in the bag. At least with my laptop, all want that taken out and placed in its own tray when going through security.  I had one person get snappy with me yesterday in DFW as I was heading home because I didn't take my camera out.  And that was because two security points earlier this trip I was told "cameras don't need to be taken out".  
So which is it?

it's whatever security at the time says it is, whether we like it or not. I'd rather accept it than cry about it.


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3 months 4 weeks ago #757989 by CharleyL
The security of the flight that I'm going to be on is very important to my welfare, so I'll do whatever they want. The only times that I have given them any trouble is when they start taking my items out of my sight in different directions. Then I yell "Stop" and tell them that they can do what is necessary, as long as they keep everything within my field of view. They have cooperated after I have said this. Usually, turning on a camera, laptop, piece of gear, etc. so they can see that it works is all that they are after, and I do my best to get them to let me do this for them. 

Charley


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3 months 3 weeks ago #758091 by Rob Cline

Razky wrote:

Fitch wrote: I love what the TSA does for our safety, however I have one burning question regarding our cameras:  Some airports I have been too make me take my camera our and have on its own tray, while others tell me to keep it in the bag. At least with my laptop, all want that taken out and placed in its own tray when going through security.  I had one person get snappy with me yesterday in DFW as I was heading home because I didn't take my camera out.  And that was because two security points earlier this trip I was told "cameras don't need to be taken out".  
So which is it?

it's whatever security at the time says it is, whether we like it or not. I'd rather accept it than cry about it.


You sound like a very likeable person with many friends.  

:rofl:


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3 months 3 weeks ago - 3 months 3 weeks ago #758092 by Rob Cline
OP- 

Ah, the age-old question of airport security protocols – enough to give even the most seasoned travelers a moment’s pause. I totally get your confusion; it seems like the rules for electronics can be as clear as mud, right?

From what you've described, it sounds like you've run into the classic inconsistency that's pretty common in airports around the globe. Generally speaking, TSA guidelines suggest that small electronics, like cameras, can stay in your bag. However, the catch is that it's often left to the discretion of the officers at the security checkpoint.

The rules can also change depending on the airport, the current threat level, or even the specific security lane. Some airports have newer technology that can get a clearer view of what's inside your bag, while others rely on older equipment that might need a little extra help (hence, the sometimes need to remove your camera).

Also, if an officer has a tough time seeing what's in your bag through the x-ray, they might ask you to remove items to get a better look, which could explain why one person got snappy. It’s not about the camera per se but more about getting a clear image.

For the least stressful experience, my best advice is to always ask or check the signs as you approach the front of the security line. When in doubt, take it out. It might add a few seconds to your process, but it can save a bit of a headache. And it never hurts to have a little extra padding around your camera to protect it if you do have to pop it in a bin.

Safe travels on your next trip, and hopefully, you’ll have a smooth sail through security with camera in tow – in or out of your bag!


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3 months 3 weeks ago #758210 by Miss Polly
I think it’s also depends on who you run into.  Technically cameras ARE supposed to be taken out and have their own bin going through security 


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3 months 3 weeks ago #758264 by Uplander
That's how it is.  I hear you though, all over the place.  Although laptop and tablet is always what they care about most of the time.  


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3 months 2 weeks ago #758338 by Tim Chiang
I think it has a lot to do with who is working there and likely judgement calls.  Just my 2 cents.


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3 months 2 weeks ago #758351 by CharleyL
Variation at these check points is good, in my opinion. If Security follows the same exact procedure every time, then those wishing to bring something through the check point without being caught will have trouble finding ways to get around it.

An example - If a guard walks the same path at the same speed around what he is guarding, all it takes to get past him is to measure how long it takes before he passes the same point again and then do the illegal deed before he returns. If he is there, but walks different paths taking different times randomly, it's much more difficult to predict when he will be back.

Charley


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3 months 2 weeks ago #758489 by Jim Photo

CharleyL wrote: Variation at these check points is good, in my opinion. If Security follows the same exact procedure every time, then those wishing to bring something through the check point without being caught will have trouble finding ways to get around it.

An example - If a guard walks the same path at the same speed around what he is guarding, all it takes to get past him is to measure how long it takes before he passes the same point again and then do the illegal deed before he returns. If he is there, but walks different paths taking different times randomly, it's much more difficult to predict when he will be back.

Charley


100% agree!  Makes things less predictable.   


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3 months 1 week ago #758555 by CaptNemo
As long as air travel is safe for my family and I, I don't care what they do at security.  


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3 months 1 week ago #758701 by CharleyL
I can still remember going through a check point about 20 years ago when all of a sudden there was a scuffle at the check point line next to me. The gentleman in that line was dressed like a contractor who it looked like had come directly from a construction site to the airport. He suddenly got surrounded by security and they were carrying him off to somewhere, with him yelling "it's my job to work with explosives, but I'm not carrying any on me". I never saw him on the flight, so I'm guessing that he got "detained". He should have gone to his hotel room, showered to wash all traces of explosives off, and then came to the airport in clean clothes, and I'll bet that he did this for his next flight.

Charley


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