Why would you shoot in RAW?

11 years 9 months ago #3791 by Gene.Culley
Being a beginner photographer, is there any reason to be shooting in RAW format? I understand that you get more of the photo kept in RAW, but for a beginner is that extra step really needed?


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11 years 9 months ago #3874 by James L
You will find many answers on this, frankly IMHO it's good to have in RAW, so if later you want to edit you have all the full usage of the image.


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11 years 9 months ago #3933 by thats fresh
depends on the type of shoot and final outcome.

you wouldnt want to shoot sports with raw files. itll just slow down your speed, buffer and workflow. but for portraits, commercial work and weddings, you may want to shoot in raw. this will allow you to work totally independent in each file and make adjustments just as you were taking the shot again.


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11 years 9 months ago #4013 by wms
I normally shoot in raw+Jpg mode this way I can make the adjustments which Raw allows yet I also have the ease and comparability of a jpg.

RAW allows me to adjust the exposure and color balance easily in post processing where I have more control over the process than I have when this processing is done in camera.
The one exception to this is when I feel a need for high speed shooting and need more photographs than the buffer in my camera will give me.

Wayne


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11 years 9 months ago #4026 by VirgilWB
Another way to look at this is: How do you like to work? RAW gives you full control over everything. For example, you shot the photo in Daylight mode in a tungsten lit room. That's going to take some work to correct in jpg. In RAW, just change the setting to Tungsten. In addition, if you need jpg files, for instance, for emails, you can always save a copy in jpg format while saving your RAW files for other uses later.

On the other hand, if you just want snapshots for 3X5s for the family (e.g., birthday parties), shoot jpg and print it.

Also, keep in mind that shooting in RAW+jpg (if that option is available on your camera) uses more memory space on your card. If you have a smaller capacity card, that may be a consideration.


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11 years 9 months ago #4047 by Gil
As a beginner I think shooting jpg for starters and getting use to your camera, proper settings,
good feel for your photo editing software and feeling like you are one with your gear is a good way to go. After that a good book on using Raw, such as the one by Jeff Schewe, would be a good guide. A RAW workflow takes some practice to get fast and proficient. A good software such as Lightroom really helps.
A RAW capture gives you more data in your image that can be salvaged and used for image corrections and manipulation. Areas that show as blown out in a jpg may well be salvaged in a RAW version of the same image. Same goes for the shadows.
While shooting RAW will slow some shooting, it really depends on the camera on how much that slowness will be. The modern high end gear will hardly know the difference. Shooting RAW+JPG will slow down things the most but it can be a useful method for some. I shoot all RAW when shooting NASCAR and still get 8 FPS using my Canons.
Gil


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11 years 9 months ago #4139 by Yasko
RAW is less compressed than JPG, and so it gives you more room for editing endeavors. Less noise and more saturated colors too. If you have a lot of storage space, a good computer system to edit those large RAW files quickly, and lots of camera card space, RAW is worth shooting every time.


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11 years 9 months ago #4140 by Steven.Powell

Yasko wrote: RAW is less compressed than JPG, and so it gives you more room for editing endeavors. Less noise and more saturated colors too. If you have a lot of storage space, a good computer system to edit those large RAW files quickly, and lots of camera card space, RAW is worth shooting every time.


So I'm guessing you shoot in RAW? You have some great answers, how long have you been in photography?


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11 years 9 months ago #4142 by Yasko
Thanks

I got my first 35mm camera, an old used honeywell Pentax 21 years ago. Been nonstop since then :)


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11 years 9 months ago #4143 by Steven.Powell

Yasko wrote: Thanks

I got my first 35mm camera, an old used honeywell Pentax 21 years ago. Been nonstop since then :)


Serious time!

Did you upload a gallery here? I would love to see your work ;)


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11 years 9 months ago #4164 by Yasko
I haven't yet, I just signed up and I'm taking a look around. Great so far! I plan to load up some soon though.


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11 years 9 months ago #4165 by KZAM

Yasko wrote: I haven't yet, I just signed up and I'm taking a look around. Great so far! I plan to load up some soon though.


I just came across one of your comments on another thread with some images, very talented. I'm looking forward to seeing more of your work myself.

Walter

I don't need no stink'in Signature! ha ha ha
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