Balancing Sky and subject exposure

2 months 2 weeks ago #700155 by Khelm
Recommendations for balancing exposure.  This particular day was over cast.  I normally like overcast when focusing on black and white photography because the overcast sky becomes good contrast and negative space.  however, I am trying to figure out the best way to properly expose images when I don't want the high contrast B&W photos.  Thanks for your suggestions and tips.  See photo below.




Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 week ago #700687 by Esseff
Following. Could do with some tips here myself.


No one kicks up there feet next to the water cooler better than this person.  Top poster - LoungeLounge Guru

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 week ago #700714 by Nikon Shooter
Balancing exposures not the solution here.

This shot needs a horizon tweak and is overexposed some.
Try dialling in an EV of say -0.7 to start with. In any case,
your histogram is your best friend prior to SR.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
This person is a posting maniac and deserves a #1 badge!Top Poster
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 week ago #700731 by Khelm
Thanks for the suggestion NS.

I didn't concern myself with the horizon since I was trying to focus on the sky/subject.  Also, I didn't edit in Post since I am not using this image for any reason other to ask this question.  Even so, I should be more aware when taking the photo.

I recently got a Fuji XT3 and have a histogram on screen.   I am still a bit overwhelmed by the different functions, options, etc, etc.  Part of slowing down when taking photos I guess.

Thanks again


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 2 days ago #702004 by Ozzie_Traveller
G'day mate

Back in film days, the instructions in the box often had a small sketch of the camera pointing downwards -maybe 20degrees- to avoid a false reading from a super-bright sky. It is a pattern for exposure that I more-or-less follow today as well

My Panny system is preset for 2 things ... i) a smallish focus point size (it is about the size of the opening square in the rear sculpture), and ii) metering (centre-weighted, occupying a circle about 1/2- the width of your pic above

If I were shooting the above scene, it would be metered from the wiggley tree trunk & its green leaves, and either a half-press of the shutter button -or- a press of the AEL lock button, before moving the camera up-down-left-right for compositional purposes

Then in pp if needed, I would select the sky and darken it a bit (again if needed)

Hope this helps
Phil from the great land Downunder
www.flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 day ago #702060 by Khelm
Is it better to expose for the brighter areas and then adjust the darker areas in Post? 

I guess I want / am trying to do as much in camera.  

You're recommending metering then recomposing?


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 day ago #702150 by Nikon Shooter
I teach to protect the whites at all costs and the safest
way to do it is using your best friend: the histogram.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
This person is a posting maniac and deserves a #1 badge!Top Poster
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 day ago #702153 by Ozzie_Traveller
G'day khelm

to follow my post above - yes
to follow NS's post above -yes also

a) go to your camera menu setup options and switch 'on' the Histogram option. This will show you a generalised sort of image inside your photo that indicates its overall exposure state. If you have an EVF you will see it -before- you take the photo, if you use a traditional SLR with OVF it will show on the LCD screen -after- you take the photo

b) from film days, the old saying was (and NS implies it is still the same today) "expose for the bright-bits and leave the shadows to look after themselves". While this will not always work (ie- no rule is universal) it does respect the scene overall (look at NS's image of the wine-coloured leaves from several days ago)

c) there will be some scenes where you -want- the skies to dominate - so you expose for them. Also there will be other scenes where you have something else that is the most important - so you expose for that item

Composition is another matter - and here you align the camera / lens to concentrate the viewer's attention onto the main subject - as per usual

Hope this helps
Phil from the great land Downunder
www.flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 day ago #702160 by Nikon Shooter
Phil's replies drive me crazy.
  1. they are so well constructed that I am ashamed to have to use a translator
  2. waaaay longer than mine, it is obvious that he is a far better typer than I am
… one day, though, one day… :P

Light is free… capturing it is not!
This person is a posting maniac and deserves a #1 badge!Top Poster
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 day ago #702176 by Khelm
Thanks Ozzie and NS I appreciate all the posts and tips!


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 13 hours ago - 2 months 13 hours ago #702273 by Ozzie_Traveller

Nikon Shooter wrote: Phil's replies drive me crazy.

  1. they are so well constructed that I am ashamed to have to use a translator
  2. waaaay longer than mine, it is obvious that he is a far better typer than I am
… one day, though, one day… :P



Ah mate .... but you're far better looking  :)
Phil


Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,

802.3K

205K

  • Facebook

    802,251 / Likes

  • Twitter

    205,000 / Followers

  • Google+

    1,620,816 / Followers

Latest Reviews

The Sony a6100 has been out for over a year now. In this long-term Sony a6100 review, learn all about its features, specs, price, and more.

Jan 13, 2021

The Panasonic G85 might be a few years old, but it still has the specs and features to make it a highly useful camera. Get all the details in this Panasonic G85 review.

Jan 12, 2021

The Olympus OM-D E-M1 I is pushing eight years old, but for budget-minded photographers, it represents excellent value in 2021.

Jan 08, 2021

The Fujifilm X100v is the latest in the X100 series of compact cameras. Does this new version improve on its predecessors? Find out in this in-depth review.

Dec 31, 2020

Forum Top Posters

Latest Articles

Processing landscape photos takes a good amount of time and effort. By educating yourself on tips for processing landscape photos, you can make the most of your editing time.

Jan 14, 2021

I got my first metal print from Printique about six weeks ago. In this Printique metal print review, learn why this might be the best metal print I've ever gotten.

Jan 13, 2021

Use these highly effective real estate photography tips to take better images of properties that help improve its chances of getting sold.

Jan 13, 2021

The Sony a6100 has been out for over a year now. In this long-term Sony a6100 review, learn all about its features, specs, price, and more.

Jan 13, 2021

Use these photography ideas to find your creativity, get organized, and utilize your time at home wisely.

Jan 12, 2021

Cropping in photography is much more than resizing an image. Instead, learning how to crop landscape photos can greatly impact the quality of the composition.

Jan 12, 2021

The Panasonic G85 might be a few years old, but it still has the specs and features to make it a highly useful camera. Get all the details in this Panasonic G85 review.

Jan 12, 2021

There are plenty of camera settings for beginners to learn. However, these important camera settings should be at the top of your list.

Jan 08, 2021