Balancing Sky and subject exposure

10 months 3 weeks ago #700155 by Khelm
Recommendations for balancing exposure.  This particular day was over cast.  I normally like overcast when focusing on black and white photography because the overcast sky becomes good contrast and negative space.  however, I am trying to figure out the best way to properly expose images when I don't want the high contrast B&W photos.  Thanks for your suggestions and tips.  See photo below.




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10 months 2 weeks ago #700687 by Esseff
Following. Could do with some tips here myself.


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10 months 2 weeks ago #700714 by Nikon Shooter
Balancing exposures not the solution here.

This shot needs a horizon tweak and is overexposed some.
Try dialling in an EV of say -0.7 to start with. In any case,
your histogram is your best friend prior to SR.

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10 months 2 weeks ago #700731 by Khelm
Thanks for the suggestion NS.

I didn't concern myself with the horizon since I was trying to focus on the sky/subject.  Also, I didn't edit in Post since I am not using this image for any reason other to ask this question.  Even so, I should be more aware when taking the photo.

I recently got a Fuji XT3 and have a histogram on screen.   I am still a bit overwhelmed by the different functions, options, etc, etc.  Part of slowing down when taking photos I guess.

Thanks again


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10 months 1 week ago #702004 by Ozzie_Traveller
G'day mate

Back in film days, the instructions in the box often had a small sketch of the camera pointing downwards -maybe 20degrees- to avoid a false reading from a super-bright sky. It is a pattern for exposure that I more-or-less follow today as well

My Panny system is preset for 2 things ... i) a smallish focus point size (it is about the size of the opening square in the rear sculpture), and ii) metering (centre-weighted, occupying a circle about 1/2- the width of your pic above

If I were shooting the above scene, it would be metered from the wiggley tree trunk & its green leaves, and either a half-press of the shutter button -or- a press of the AEL lock button, before moving the camera up-down-left-right for compositional purposes

Then in pp if needed, I would select the sky and darken it a bit (again if needed)

Hope this helps
Phil from the great land Downunder
www.flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/


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10 months 1 week ago #702060 by Khelm
Is it better to expose for the brighter areas and then adjust the darker areas in Post? 

I guess I want / am trying to do as much in camera.  

You're recommending metering then recomposing?


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10 months 1 week ago #702150 by Nikon Shooter
I teach to protect the whites at all costs and the safest
way to do it is using your best friend: the histogram.

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10 months 1 week ago #702153 by Ozzie_Traveller
G'day khelm

to follow my post above - yes
to follow NS's post above -yes also

a) go to your camera menu setup options and switch 'on' the Histogram option. This will show you a generalised sort of image inside your photo that indicates its overall exposure state. If you have an EVF you will see it -before- you take the photo, if you use a traditional SLR with OVF it will show on the LCD screen -after- you take the photo

b) from film days, the old saying was (and NS implies it is still the same today) "expose for the bright-bits and leave the shadows to look after themselves". While this will not always work (ie- no rule is universal) it does respect the scene overall (look at NS's image of the wine-coloured leaves from several days ago)

c) there will be some scenes where you -want- the skies to dominate - so you expose for them. Also there will be other scenes where you have something else that is the most important - so you expose for that item

Composition is another matter - and here you align the camera / lens to concentrate the viewer's attention onto the main subject - as per usual

Hope this helps
Phil from the great land Downunder
www.flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/


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10 months 1 week ago #702160 by Nikon Shooter
Phil's replies drive me crazy.
  1. they are so well constructed that I am ashamed to have to use a translator
  2. waaaay longer than mine, it is obvious that he is a far better typer than I am
… one day, though, one day… :P

Light is free… capturing it is not!
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10 months 1 week ago #702176 by Khelm
Thanks Ozzie and NS I appreciate all the posts and tips!


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10 months 1 week ago - 10 months 1 week ago #702273 by Ozzie_Traveller

Nikon Shooter wrote: Phil's replies drive me crazy.

  1. they are so well constructed that I am ashamed to have to use a translator
  2. waaaay longer than mine, it is obvious that he is a far better typer than I am
… one day, though, one day… :P



Ah mate .... but you're far better looking  :)
Phil


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