Should beginner photographers buy pro level lenses?

9 months 5 days ago #649384 by Liem Stailey
I'm referring to those that know they will be in photography for the long haul.  Does it make sense to not buy pro level lenses?  After all you buy lesser priced lenses, which is great because you save money.  However in the long game, you will likely want to upgrade, then you have to buy new glass, pricier lenses and home you can sell your old.  

Well this is what I was just told last night by another photographer I ran into shooting some night stuff.  So is there logic in what I was told?  Basically should we be budgeting to just buy pro level gear? 


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9 months 5 days ago #649385 by Nikon Shooter
Ultimately, lenses are capturing the images and they are,
compared to bodies, somewhat less prone to age, become
obsolete. In 1988, I bought the F4 and the 600 mm ƒ4. The
body — still working perfectly — has long been retired but
the lens continues its career on my D850.

Lens are really a long term investment.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
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9 months 4 days ago #649438 by Liem Stailey
600mm?  Well that's a $5000 lens isn't it?  :)

yeah I would keep that one too.  But referring too 24-70mm, 70-200mm, lenses like those.  Does it make sense to buy the best of the best now to prevent having to sell others to get the better lenses?  


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9 months 4 days ago #649440 by Nikon Shooter
I told about the 600 as an extreme example of an investment
that was not undone. The same applies to all lenses because
one will lose money every time anything is undone.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
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9 months 4 days ago #649450 by Troponin
I started with an a6000 so that I could get the Sony 90mm macro lens when I started. I thought it was well worth it. It's still my favorite lens! 


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9 months 4 days ago #649451 by garyrhook

Liem Stailey wrote: yeah I would keep that one too.  But referring too 24-70mm, 70-200mm, lenses like those.  Does it make sense to buy the best of the best now to prevent having to sell others to get the better lenses?  


There are no cheap versions of those lenses, only older editions and/or used. Even third party products can be spendy.

So, from a meta perspective (and repeating what you've already stated above):

What makes sense is to start off with one good lens and work with it. Decide if you want to pursue photography to the point of heavy investment. And while you're doing that, learn that the best camera is the one you have with you.

Once you've arrived at the decision that you're there to stay, and you know that it takes certain gear to meet your needs, then invest in it, yes. But do you need the Nikon 70-200 f/2.8E over the VRII? Probably not, and the latter can be had used for half the $ of the former. Each lens will require a separate decision.

IMNSHO, of course. I could be wrong.


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9 months 4 days ago #649461 by Ozzie_Traveller
G'day Liem

There is an age-old saying used across many areas of life ... "buy the best that you can afford" ~ and cameras & lenses [or fishing rods or golf clubs or whatever] are no exception

I personally would NOT recommend that a novice or a "keen newbie" go out and buy a pro-level camera or pro-level lens etc.

Ideas change, brands change as you discover more things about your new hobby and different features become more or less important. So to start off paying heaps of $$ for stuff that might easily end up gathering dust within a year or two, is IMO quite silly

Phil from the great land Downunder
www.flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/


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9 months 4 days ago #649496 by Artview
I still use my entry level DSLR with a standard lens. I'd say it's counter productive to buy expensive gear as a newbie. The reason is that you learn how to use the equipment, find the right settings, lights, composition etc. when you have cheaper equipment. You can still take great photos with you smartphone. I still use my three year old phone and sometimes takes better photos with it than my DSLR's.


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8 months 1 week ago #652048 by Jared-Weaver
I was taught lenses before bodies for the following reason: 

A pro line lens will generally not hold your camera back. Putting a mediocre lens on a pro body however just makes no sense because the bigger sensor will accentuate the shortcomings of the lens. Using a pro lens on even a beginner line body will give you the clearest, sharpest images provided that you focus and expose correctly. 


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8 months 1 week ago #652222 by Johan Alonso

Troponin wrote: I started with an a6000 so that I could get the Sony 90mm macro lens when I started. I thought it was well worth it. It's still my favorite lens! 


What camera are you using now?


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