Whats the color temperature of a church with only candle light?

2 months 1 week ago #674617 by MYoung
I just got a call and a possible new client.  They are getting married in July and what's interesting about their wedding is that the church will only be lit by candles.  So, that's a first.  I'm just thinking about things right now and wondering what would the color temperature in Kelvin or ball park?  

Thank you


Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 week ago #674618 by garyrhook
It will be very warm, and there will be very little light. They are not doing you any favors.

It's also asinine when your guests can't see what's going on. But that's just me.

I would suggest you adopt a B&W policy for that kind of situation. There won't be any color to speak of anyways.


Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 week ago - 2 months 1 week ago #674626 by Randy Shaw
Take a look at the chart below.  You are going to be right around 1000 to 2000K.  Just make sure you are shooting in RAW, that way you can adjust the white balance in post afterwards.  




Photo Comments
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 week ago #674627 by MYoung
Perfect and I just heard that I can't use a tripod.  Hmmm, this will get interesting.   


Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 week ago #674636 by icepics
I've only ever done a few pictures by candlelight (with some window light). It was done using higher speed/faster B&W film. I got the person near the candle, up fairly close (within maybe a few feet), with the background dark.

I don't know that I'd want to take on something like this without having done something like this before. I'm wondering if there'd be any way to try something similar, but I can't think of anything other than candlelight services etc. more around the holidays. You'd probably need to be aware of where you can set up to be getting as much light as possible on the subjects. Or if you haven't yet committed to it then, I don't know... it could be challenging if all you'll have is candlelight for the ceremony to be sure you'd be able to get some nice photos.

Sharon
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 week ago #674643 by Nikon Shooter
How can 1000°K be warmer that 5000°K ?

The scale used to measure colour temperature is in Kelvin degrees.
The scale used to appreciate colours tones is artistic, read cultural.

When art was describing colour tones, there were no measuring
scale to use and lord Kelvin was not yet born. In art, warmer tones
are in fact colder than the measured colour temperature.

Photography apps are facing the same problem: "How to set up the
colour temperature slider direction?" Measure (in °K) and apprecia-
tion (in art) are going in different directions.

The dilemma was with a compromise: using the Kelvin scale for precise 
references, the art definition or description of what warmer tones are.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
This person is a posting maniac and deserves a #1 badge!Top Poster
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 week ago #674649 by effron
Why does it matter? Shoot in RAW and one click fix the WB in ACR (post).....

Why so serious?
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 week ago - 2 months 1 week ago #674656 by Nikon Shooter
ADDENDUM AND CORRECTION

How can 1000°K be warmer than 5000°K ?

The scale used to measure colour temperature — or more precisely
kinetic energy levels — is the Kelvin scale. OTH, the scale used to
appreciate colours tones is artistic, read cultural, at human scale.

When art was describing colour tones, there were no measuring
scales to use and lord Kelvin was not yet born. In art, warmer tones
refer to the human experience associating the "warmer" colours of
fire and the heat radiating from it and blue to cold. So red is artisti-
cally warmer than blue… technically, it is the other way around.

In the visual spectrum, from red to violet, the warmer tones are seen
at the lower part of it and the colder ones like violet at the higher end.




The same visual spectrum is an integrated part of the Kelvin scale and
is a very narrow band in it.




Reds are measured as cold in K temperature in the visible spectrum,
they extend to so called infra red and are felt as hot by the skin. The
higher end — from blue to violet — are warmer on that scale though
artistidally described as cooler.



Photography apps have a problem: "How to set up the WB slider direction?"
Measure (in K) and expression (in art) are going in different directions.

The dilemma was solved with using the Kelvin scale — from left cold to right
warm — for precise references — and the art definition or description of what
​warmer tones are — from cold to warm. Confusing.

Light is free… capturing it is not!
This person is a posting maniac and deserves a #1 badge!Top Poster
Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,
2 months 1 week ago #674776 by ThatNikonGuy
Good post


Photo Comments

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

,

802.3K

205K

1.62M

  • Facebook

    802,251 / Likes

  • Twitter

    205,000 / Followers

  • Google+

    1,620,816 / Followers

Latest Reviews

The Sony a7S II might be almost five years old, but as you'll see in this Sony a7S II review, it still packs a mighty punch with a small price tag.

Mar 23, 2020

In this Nikon D780 review, learn about the D780's features, specs, video capabilities, and more. Also learn how to score a discounted price on a D780 and how you can extend your gear budget!

Mar 13, 2020

In the Sony a6000 vs Sony a6100 battle, which one comes out on top? One offers a lower price tag while the other has more updated features. Find out which camera is best for you in this buyer's guide.

Mar 13, 2020

The Canon EOS RP is an entry-level camera that has some excellent features. In this Canon EOS RP review, learn all about its pros, cons, features, price, and more!

Mar 03, 2020

Forum Top Posters

Latest Articles

This Max Art Pro canvas print review offers insights into the quality of Max Art Pro canvases, as well as a few things about Max Art Pro, like their products, promo codes, return policy, and more.

Apr 08, 2020

Dragging big, heavy, and complicated lighting gear around simply isn't necessary. With these portable lighting tips, you can get the light you need without the frustration and expenditure of money!

Apr 07, 2020

In this Nations Photo Lab metal print review, learn about the quality of my metal print, as well as details about Nations Photo Lab, Nations Photo Lab products, and much more!

Apr 07, 2020

With these tips for photographing real estate, you'll learn how to prep a home for photos in the springtime for maximum visual appeal.

Apr 07, 2020

Shutterfly is a household name for photographic prints. In this Shutterfly metal print review, find out if this popular Shutterfly product is a must or if you should skip it.

Apr 06, 2020

The mirrorless vs. DSLR debate has raged for years. So which one is best for 2020? Find out in this camera gear comparison guide.

Apr 06, 2020

To create a vlog people want to watch, you need the right vlogging accessories. But you don't have to spend a fortune on accessories for vlogging...get some budget-friendly recommendations!

Apr 06, 2020

Mpix is a popular online printer. But the question is, are Mpix products like their metal prints worth the price? Find out in this Mpix metal print review!

Apr 03, 2020