D3s finally died.

2 weeks 2 days ago #762801 by Scotty
Going to replace it with a D4 or D4s.

Thoughts?

When the last candle has been blown out
and the last glass of champagne has been drunk
All that you are left with are the memories and the images-David Cooke.

Photo Comments
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2 weeks 2 days ago #762803 by CharleyL
Just curious, what was the specific reason for failure? 

Charley


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2 weeks 1 day ago #762808 by Scotty

CharleyL wrote: Just curious, what was the specific reason for failure? 

Charley


high shutter count. Shutter box fell apart.

When the last candle has been blown out
and the last glass of champagne has been drunk
All that you are left with are the memories and the images-David Cooke.

Photo Comments
,
2 weeks 1 day ago #762809 by CharleyL
Well I thought I might be able to help, but that I have no suggestions for. I doubt Canon Service would want to touch it based on it's age too. Do you know the shutter count? Again, just curious.

Charley 


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2 weeks 1 day ago #762810 by Scotty

CharleyL wrote: Well I thought I might be able to help, but that I have no suggestions for. I doubt Canon Service would want to touch it based on it's age too. Do you know the shutter count? Again, just curious.

Charley 


It’s a Nikon D3s.

When the last candle has been blown out
and the last glass of champagne has been drunk
All that you are left with are the memories and the images-David Cooke.

Photo Comments
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2 weeks 1 day ago #762812 by Street Shark
How many shutter clicks were on it at time of death?  


Photo Comments
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2 weeks 1 day ago - 2 weeks 1 day ago #762814 by Ben Vanderbilt
Oh no, sorry to hear about your Nikon D3 taking its final bow, but it sounds like you're ready to move on to newer horizons! Both the D4 and D4s are stellar choices if you want my 2 cents, truly worthy successors in the Nikon lineage. Here’s a quick rundown to help you decide:

Nikon D4: This beast marked a significant leap forward from the D3, with improvements like a 16.2MP sensor (up from the D3's 12.1MP), enhanced ISO range for better low-light shooting, and faster continuous shooting speeds. It’s equipped with a 51-point autofocus system that’s quick and reliable, making it great for sports and wildlife photography. The D4 also introduced video capabilities to Nikon's single-digit D series, offering 1080p recording.

Nikon D4s: The D4s takes what made the D4 great and tweaks it for even better performance. It boasts a slightly improved sensor, better ISO performance (allowing for crisper images in low light), and a bump in continuous shooting speed. The autofocus system has been refined for better accuracy and tracking, especially in challenging conditions. Battery life gets a boost in the D4s, and there are some ergonomic and usability improvements that make it a tad more user-friendly.Choosing between them boils down to a few considerations:
  • Performance: If you’re looking for the best low-light performance and slightly faster shooting speeds, the D4s has the edge.
  • Budget: The D4 might be more budget-friendly, considering it’s older. If you find a good deal, it's still an excellent camera.
  • Features: While both cameras are similar, the D4s offers refinements that can be valuable for high-speed photography and challenging light conditions.
Ultimately, both are fantastic cameras that continue the legacy of the D3 with aplomb. If you can swing it, the D4s’s refinements make it a slightly better choice, especially for demanding shooting scenarios. But, the D4 is by no means a slouch and could serve you just as well, depending on your needs and budget. Happy shooting with your future Nikon beast!


Photo Comments
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2 weeks 1 day ago #762816 by Scotty

Ben Vanderbilt wrote: Oh no, sorry to hear about your Nikon D3 taking its final bow, but it sounds like you're ready to move on to newer horizons! Both the D4 and D4s are stellar choices if you want my 2 cents, truly worthy successors in the Nikon lineage. Here’s a quick rundown to help you decide:

Nikon D4: This beast marked a significant leap forward from the D3, with improvements like a 16.2MP sensor (up from the D3's 12.1MP), enhanced ISO range for better low-light shooting, and faster continuous shooting speeds. It’s equipped with a 51-point autofocus system that’s quick and reliable, making it great for sports and wildlife photography. The D4 also introduced video capabilities to Nikon's single-digit D series, offering 1080p recording.

Nikon D4s: The D4s takes what made the D4 great and tweaks it for even better performance. It boasts a slightly improved sensor, better ISO performance (allowing for crisper images in low light), and a bump in continuous shooting speed. The autofocus system has been refined for better accuracy and tracking, especially in challenging conditions. Battery life gets a boost in the D4s, and there are some ergonomic and usability improvements that make it a tad more user-friendly.Choosing between them boils down to a few considerations:

  • Performance: If you’re looking for the best low-light performance and slightly faster shooting speeds, the D4s has the edge.
  • Budget: The D4 might be more budget-friendly, considering it’s older. If you find a good deal, it's still an excellent camera.
  • Features: While both cameras are similar, the D4s offers refinements that can be valuable for high-speed photography and challenging light conditions.
Ultimately, both are fantastic cameras that continue the legacy of the D3 with aplomb. If you can swing it, the D4s’s refinements make it a slightly better choice, especially for demanding shooting scenarios. But, the D4 is by no means a slouch and could serve you just as well, depending on your needs and budget. Happy shooting with your future Nikon beast!


leaning towards d4s! Thanks! 

I had a d3s not a d3.  :O

shutter count was 240k

When the last candle has been blown out
and the last glass of champagne has been drunk
All that you are left with are the memories and the images-David Cooke.

Photo Comments
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2 weeks 1 day ago #762822 by Ben Vanderbilt
240k?!  That is a serious number of shots.  


Photo Comments
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2 weeks 23 hours ago #762850 by Adam S
Why not move to the Z8 or Z9? 


Photo Comments
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1 week 6 days ago #762880 by Victoria A

Adam S wrote: Why not move to the Z8 or Z9? 


Without using adapter, what ever lenses he has, he won't be able to use on these cameras.  Different mounts.  


Photo Comments
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1 week 6 days ago #762882 by Shadowfixer1
D850
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1 week 5 days ago #762924 by Randy Fisher
Man, either are awesome cameras, but I have to agree on that D850 recommendation 


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1 week 5 days ago #762939 by Ontherocks
D4s or as already mentioned the D850

On a side note, you got your moneys worth from that D3!


Photo Comments
The following user(s) said Thank You: Scotty
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1 week 4 days ago - 1 week 4 days ago #762948 by Scotty

Shadowfixer1 wrote: D850


my d800 still fits that need.

ended up going with the d4 I got a crazy good deal on one with 3k shutter count and mint condition.

Messing with it today and it’s a good upgrade from the d3s.

For who asked about why not a z9 or z8, it’s not needed for me.  I won’t touch the limit of the d4. Didn’t feel like spending a few grand then getting new adapters. When I move to mirrorless it’ll be a full migration.

i’m taking advantage of dslr prices dropping. I wish the lenses would drop drastically.

i used to chase the dragon of getting the top cams every release but cam tech and IQ peaked while ago for 90 percent of shooting. I’d rather spend the money on places to travel to for shooting.

When the last candle has been blown out
and the last glass of champagne has been drunk
All that you are left with are the memories and the images-David Cooke.

Photo Comments
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