Rookies claiming to be Pro Photographer killing the industry?

9 years 3 months ago #171414 by Stealthy Ninja

Rob pix4u2 wrote: Just because you have a DSLR doesn't make you a photographer though I have met some folks who think that it does. I personally know of at least two instances of "bad photographers" in the past 6 months who took umbrage with me over the lack of quality of their work and on e who is assigned to follow a friend of mine who is a team mascot who doesn't know that a photo can be done in portrait orientation.


I lost count the amount of times someone asked me which camera they should buy to make their photos as good as mine. :pinch:
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9 years 3 months ago #171431 by butterflygirl921
I hate it when someone thinks since they took photos from a little kid with a rinky dink disposible camera that they are a photographer and they still only use those rinky dink cameras and dont even know what a shutter is. I have run into people who look at my photos and go I can do that meanwhile im trying to get them as a client i absolutely hate it


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9 years 2 months ago #174433 by Trilby
I've done three years of formal training, and have about 15 years experience and I still don't feel comfortable calling myself a professional. Having said that, I have learned that one of the major differences between professional photographers and non-professionals, is that professionals have the balls to charge what their work is really worth.

In some ways, I think this tendency for anyone with a $500 camera to call themselves 'professional' works well for people like me. I recently had another local girl tell me she was just starting up and to check out her page....I did, and I don't want to sound harsh but if she's professional, I'm a master and this is obvious even to the untrained eye. This works extremely well for me as anyone that finds her will probably find me too. I also think that the world is awash with mediocre snapshots these days, so truly special work does stand out. I'm not sure whether these Rookies are killing the industry, or just causing it to readjust a bit....

I had a girl say to me the other day that she'd like to get into photography, and my photos were 'awesome' so she needed to know what kind of camera I had so she could start taking photos like that too :dry: The professional in me advised her that as a beginner, she'd probably be better off buying something less expensive than a Nikon D300s. It was only afterwards that I thought I probably should have been offended.

There is no black & white; it's all 18% grey.
The following user(s) said Thank You: DJ Tangeman
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9 years 2 months ago #174614 by Stealthy Ninja
@trilby That's because the better you are the more you know how much you suck.
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9 years 1 month ago #190645 by Darrell
I can't believe what I am reading, I am fairly new to pro photography, and feel I charge accordingly. Everyone who has hired me has reviewed my web page and has made the decission based on my fee and the work that I have done. At present I tend to go for weddings that perhaps the couple can not afford a photographer, so I give a very good deal and they get some great pictures and I get to learn more. If some bride comes to me when she had planned to hire a high end photograper than she is either stupid or thinks the high end guy is over priced. Rather than saying you get what you pay for, I say you get what the photograper has done in the past. This lady should of seen what this cheaper guy's work looks like.
To suggest that the only way you can have good pictures taken of your wedding is to pay big bucks is just not true... The truth is, if you want good pictures hire some one who takes good pictures....

You will not be judged as a photographer by the pictures you take, but by the pictures you show.
The following user(s) said Thank You: _Colleen_
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9 years 1 month ago #190668 by Scotty

Darrell wrote: I can't believe what I am reading, I am fairly new to pro photography, and feel I charge accordingly. Everyone who has hired me has reviewed my web page and has made the decission based on my fee and the work that I have done. At present I tend to go for weddings that perhaps the couple can not afford a photographer, so I give a very good deal and they get some great pictures and I get to learn more. If some bride comes to me when she had planned to hire a high end photograper than she is either stupid or thinks the high end guy is over priced. Rather than saying you get what you pay for, I say you get what the photograper has done in the past. This lady should of seen what this cheaper guy's work looks like.
To suggest that the only way you can have good pictures taken of your wedding is to pay big bucks is just not true... The truth is, if you want good pictures hire some one who takes good pictures....


A majority of the budget photographers out there is subpar compared to the bunch that is talented. Like it or not, the market has become flooded.

When the last candle has been blown out
and the last glass of champagne has been drunk
All that you are left with are the memories and the images-David Cooke.

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9 years 1 month ago #190670 by _Colleen_
EVERY industry has this issue. I have to come across one yet that does not.

photographer (fəˈtɒɡrəfə)
— n
a person who takes photographs, either as a hobby or a profession.

To be a professional photographer:
1. Have a business plan
2. Market yourself
3. Know how to take good photos.

Like it or not, to be a professional means running a business. Plain and simple. When someone tells to me, "I could do that" I reply, "Great, but I did it first. Why not have a original, instead of an imitation?"

Seriously, take it all in stride and move on. Some people are only happy when they feel superior to others. Just let it go and move on. Why trouble yourself with those people when there are plenty of others out there who will love you and your work?!

And............before any one asks, no I am not a professional. I am a person who loves my camera and what I can create with it. I never want to be labeled a professional. I want to create photos of what I like. I never want to be hindered by being a 'professional.'

:patriot:

I do not comment often, but when I do, it is always profound. **Laughing at myself**
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9 years 1 month ago #190675 by Scotty

_Colleen_ wrote: EVERY industry has this issue. I have to come across one yet that does not.

photographer (fəˈtɒɡrəfə)
— n
a person who takes photographs, either as a hobby or a profession.

To be a professional photographer:
1. Have a business plan
2. Market yourself
3. Know how to take good photos.

Like it or not, to be a professional means running a business. Plain and simple. When someone tells to me, "I could do that" I reply, "Great, but I did it first. Why not have a original, instead of an imitation?"

Seriously, take it all in stride and move on. Some people are only happy when they feel superior to others. Just let it go and move on. Why trouble yourself with those people when there are plenty of others out there who will love you and your work?!

And............before any one asks, no I am not a professional. I am a person who loves my camera and what I can create with it. I never want to be labeled a professional. I want to create photos of what I like. I never want to be hindered by being a 'professional.'

:patriot:


Being pro tends to suck the fun out of it.

When the last candle has been blown out
and the last glass of champagne has been drunk
All that you are left with are the memories and the images-David Cooke.

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9 years 1 month ago #190699 by baldman11
Last year I turned pro after years of being in another industry and people telling me I'm too good not to it as a profession. And while I agree that there is a group of individuals killing the industry. I wouldn't classify them as rookies but more as part-timers. And yes they are doing a great disservice to anyone trying to make a living at it. Though that is not the only problem. There seems to be this great misconception amongst the masses that because it's digital and not film it's easy to take great pictures. After all you just need a good camera and lenses right? WRONG!! The woman in the original post got what she paid for. A part timer who had no clue as to how to properly finish the image and make a nice presentation. Unfortunately the wedding industry isn't the only industry that has fallen prey to these lines of thinking. I had a women who owns a small boutique and line of clothing post on Craig's list that she needed a photographer to shoot her new line of clothing. After contacting her and asking exactly what she wanted so I could prepare a quote for her, she informed me she knew what she wanted to spend. Her budget was set at $35 for every 10 items of clothing. And since she combinations of tops and bottoms, you guessed it, it broke down to $7 per shot. The best part about it was she expected the photographer to provide the model as well. I know it wasn't professional of me but I just hung up after she said that. And yes I feel justified in hanging up on her as she was not being professional (or realistic for that matter).


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9 years 1 month ago #190701 by Baydream
Craig's List is both a great thing and a terrible thing. Because of the price (free), some people expect to get something for next to nothing.

Shoot, learn and share. It will make you a better photographer.
fineartamerica.com/profiles/john-g-schickler.html?tab=artwork

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9 years 1 month ago #190707 by Croc Bait
Welcome to the world of Capitalism mate. It happens in EVERY industry that people get under cut by competion and new comers. I run a crocodile farm and I still have to watch out for people undercutting and competing for the sale. If you dont like competition, get a job as a public servant and stop crying over spilt milk!!!!!


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9 years 1 month ago #191024 by Stealthy Ninja

Scotty wrote:
Being pro tends to suck the fun out of it.


Amen. Still beats working at a desk editing photos all day for a living... wait-a-minnet?!?! :blink:
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9 years 1 month ago #191025 by Stealthy Ninja

baldman11 wrote: Last year I turned pro after years of being in another industry and people telling me I'm too good not to it as a profession. And while I agree that there is a group of individuals killing the industry. I wouldn't classify them as rookies but more as part-timers. And yes they are doing a great disservice to anyone trying to make a living at it. Though that is not the only problem. There seems to be this great misconception amongst the masses that because it's digital and not film it's easy to take great pictures. After all you just need a good camera and lenses right? WRONG!! The woman in the original post got what she paid for. A part timer who had no clue as to how to properly finish the image and make a nice presentation. Unfortunately the wedding industry isn't the only industry that has fallen prey to these lines of thinking. I had a women who owns a small boutique and line of clothing post on Craig's list that she needed a photographer to shoot her new line of clothing. After contacting her and asking exactly what she wanted so I could prepare a quote for her, she informed me she knew what she wanted to spend. Her budget was set at $35 for every 10 items of clothing. And since she combinations of tops and bottoms, you guessed it, it broke down to $7 per shot. The best part about it was she expected the photographer to provide the model as well. I know it wasn't professional of me but I just hung up after she said that. And yes I feel justified in hanging up on her as she was not being professional (or realistic for that matter).


I agree with most of what you said but just because someone does it "part time" doesn't mean they suck at anything really.
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9 years 1 month ago #191234 by Caprici
Rookie or not while I get what you are saying I believe the onus is on the client to do their due diligence when hiring a photographer. They should understand it is not just about how cheap they can get the service for but how good is the service being provided. Those who fail to ask for a portfolio or to see even a few pictures of prior work done at a wedding or wherever have only themselves to blame. People claiming to be professional are not the problem those who choose to ignorantly hire them are to blame.

Caprici
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9 years 1 month ago #191238 by Baydream

Caprici wrote: Rookie or not while I get what you are saying I believe the onus is on the client to do their due diligence when hiring a photographer. They should understand it is not just about how cheap they can get the service for but how good is the service being provided. Those who fail to ask for a portfolio or to see even a few pictures of prior work done at a wedding or wherever have only themselves to blame. People claiming to be professional are not the problem those who choose to ignorantly hire them are to blame.

:agree: Just like plumbers, carpenters and any other craftsperson.

Shoot, learn and share. It will make you a better photographer.
fineartamerica.com/profiles/john-g-schickler.html?tab=artwork

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